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Old 22-09-2013, 08:47   #1
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The Real Deal Regarding Mexican Visas...

current and up to date info regarding the mexican visas and requirements for same----

Mexico Immigration Visa Laws and Application Process Summary
'
Quote:
Mexico Immigration Laws and Application Process Summary
US PassportThe following Mexico immigration information is provided as a resource for our readers and will be updated periodically as policy and changes are made and brought to our attention. As with any government rules they can be dynamic in nature when it comes to implementation and timing.

As of August 2013, we believe the information we provide here is correct. We have also provided some additional links to other resources at the bottom of this page.

Before you get too far along please read these quick tips prior to starting any process through the Mexico Institute of National Immigration INM website.

Do not click on the “English” option at the top of the page because that will take you to the “Home” page which is the only page with the English option. We suggest using Google Translate which does a nice job of making the form and instructions usable for English-speakers.

To obtain, renew or change your immigration status, you must start here by filling out an online application, being accepted and receiving a NUE.

IF you have not previously had an extended immigration status in Mexico, like and FM2 or FM3 you MUST begin your temporal application process through a Mexican consulate in your home country. You cannot apply within Mexico with a tourist visa.

Mexico’s Immigration Rules as of August, 2013
Beginning on November 1, 2012, four new status categories were created and the old FM2 or FM3, immigrant or non-immigrant statuses have mostly expired. However, all current FM2 and FM3 statuses will remain valid until their expiration dates and people holding current FM2′s and FM3′s will only have to comply with the new rules when they apply for renewals under the new system when they will receive the new ID cards, called “Tarjeta de Residencia”.

“Visitante”
The first status category is “Visitante”. This status encompasses non-working visitors (a typical tourist), working visitors, visitors for adoptions and humanitarians. It’s valid for 6 months and visitors have to leave the country within 6 months. These permits will still be handed out from the airlines, ship, or at the border. It’s important to keep your tourist visa with your passport.

If a tourist wants to upgrade their status to Residente Temporal or Residente Permanente, they will have to leave the country after 180 days and apply from their home country. INM is expected to release the new regulations to explain how tourists can begin the residency application process by applying online or at their Mexican Consulate.

“Residente Temporal”
The second status category is “Residente Temporal”. This status is similar to the old FM2 and FM3. With this status, temporary residents may enter and leave the country as many times as they like. Obtaining a work visa is possible and there is a 4 year limit. Foreigners who have obtained this status meet qualification characteristics such as a financial officer, investor, professional position of trust such as teacher or doctor, scientist, technical expert, artist or sports athlete. There are more characteristics as well such those seeking political asylum and refugees.

“Residente Temporal Estudiante”
Exchange students, researchers, and educators make up the third status category of “Residente Temporal Estudiante”.

“Residente Permanente”
The fourth status is “Residente Permanente” and means you have “No Immigrant” status. With this status you may stay Insurance for Mexicoin the country indefinitely, you have the right to work, and you do not have to renew your status. Permanent residency can be granted after 4 years of Temporary Residency vs. the current 5 year requirement.

Residents may also gain Permanent residency through 2 years of marriage or a common law relationship with a Mexican citizen. However, permanent residency also depends on the applicant successfully completing 2 years of temporary residency concurrent with the marriage.

Foreigners will also be able to apply for permanent residency through a point system. If an applicant has enough points based on level of education, work experience, skills in the development of science and technology, international surveys, and other professional areas, they may apply for permanent residency before the 4 years is up.



How The New Residency Statuses Affect Importing A Car
Aduana is the agency that dictates auto import issues. Once the new statuses are in force, the auto permits will line up with the new statuses. Until the new statuses are in full force, there may be an amnesty period to allow foreigners to resolve any issues with permits. There are also regions of Mexico where permits are not required like Baja and parts of Sonora.

You can expect an update on the formal rules soon but it will be tied to your immigration status as this was a recent change made with aduana just 2 years ago.

The Paperwork
As with all processes involving any brand of government, you will need documentation. To obtain/renew your Mexican visa, you will need to provide:
a) A Letter addressed to your local INM office Delegado requesting the type of visa your would like to apply for.

Proof of Income
Residente Temporal applicants must submit documents proving they they meet one of the following requirements with their applications:

Original and copy of proof of investments or bank accounts with average monthly balance equivalent to 20,000 days of the minimum wage in the Federal District during the last twelve months or
Original and copies of documents showing monthly employment or unencumbered pension income greater than 400 days of the minimum wage in the Federal District, for the past six months.
The legal minimum daily wage in the Federal District in 2012 is 62.33 pesos, so 400 times that is 24,932 pesos, or $1,890 dollars at today’s exchange rate of 13.19 pesos to the dollar. This amount is increased by 50% for each dependent. A married couple applying for the new Residente Temporal visa are required to have a minimum monthly income of $2,835.00

20,000 days minimum wage is 1,246,600 pesos, or $94,500 dollars.

An applicant for Residente Permanente must show either the same 20,000 days minimum wage in investments or a monthly employment or pension income of 500 times the minimum wage. That would be $2,365 dollars per month of income. A married couple would require $3,548 per month of income.

Proof of sufficient monthly income, as per the chart below (2013 Federal District minimum wage [“FDMW”]= 64.76 MXN; exchange rate used = 13.19 MXN/$1)

Visa Type

Produce documentation showing

In Pesos

In Dollars

Residente Temporal
Monthly income of:

400 X FDMW

$24,932 MXN

$1,890 USD

Avg daily acct balance of:

20,000 X FDMW

$1,246,600 MXN

$94,500 USD

Residente Permanente
Monthly income of:

500 X FDMW

$31,194 MXN

$2,365 USD

Avg daily acct balance of:

25,000 X FDMW

$1,708,000 MXN

$129,520 USD



Proof of Address
c) Proof of Mexico address, such as a utility bill (does not have to be in your name), or bank statement (in your name).

d) Three photos in color, passport style and a profile – two front and one side, with the ears and forehead uncovered, without jewelry and glasses. (most local immigration offices have photo services located adjacent or near them).

e) A letter of application (from INM internet site), or the “NUE” number of your application; however, a copy of the accepted application with the NUE number is best.

f) Original and copies of US passport, and any recent INM visa, or FMM (tourist) paperwork.

g) For your first application, also bring your birth certificate and marriage license (if appropriate) and, of course, a copy or 2 of each.

As a precaution against having to make a second or third trip to INM office, we suggest having two copies of everything. DO NOT expect the Immigration office to make copies of anything, you must provide your own photo copies of all documents requested.

After the first time application, proof of income and residency will no longer be required for the following three years or until your renewal date (if less than 4 years). Instead, what is required is a letter signed by the visa holder that all information on the original application is still valid. There will be no renewals required of a permanent visa card and it will allow working.

The regulations for the new immigration law (la ley aduana) went into effect November 10, 2012,. The current fees are:

Pesos

Visa

Fee

Residente Temporal

3,130 MXN/1 year

4,690 MXN/2 years

5,940 MXN/3 years

7,040 MXN/4 years

Residente Permanente

3,815 MXN one time

The link to check on the status of your application is:Currently, the link to apply for Residente Temporal is: Migrantes - Instituto Nacional de Migración

Seguimiento de Trámite - Instituto Nacional de Migración

Our friends at Yucalandia have a great blog post on more of the specifics and how to figure the income requirements…make sure to check that for the details; the income requirements are towards the bottom of this article.

Additional resources and Mexican attorney interpretations of the new immigration laws in Mexico 2012-2013 Linked Here

Mexico Visa FAQ’s
What is the difference between Temporal and Permanente? Temporal is good for up to four years with a fee for each year (payable each year, or in any combination, or as a one-time fee). After four years on a Temporal Visa, you must change to a Permanente.
Permanente permits you to live in Mexico indefinitely with a one-time fee, after four years residence.
Do the years under the FM system count toward the Residente visas? Yes
What are the time options for each visa?
Temporal: 1 to 4 years

Permanente: No limit

Changing from an FM visa to a Permanente (or Temporal) can be done in Mexico? Yes, if you have had an FM2 or 3 for 4 years.
What are the income requirements when dealing with a husband and a wife, and/or family? On, combined incomes? It can be if you want; for instance, if only one of you has the basic qualifying income, or account balance.To include a spouse, or any other qualifying family member, you add 100 to the number of days required for the valid Residente visa – per person. You will also need documentation proving the relationship (i.e., an apostilled marriage license).To add your spouse to your Residente Temporal, you add 100 to the 400 days of FDMW. So, for you to qualify as a couple, you need 500 days of FDMW or, $32,380 MXN, or $2590 USD income per month.For all other purposes, a “family” visa adjunct is treated individually.
Viva Mexico!
Need More VISA Information?

We have been through the process here in Mexico a few times and have found some great resources. Tell us a little bit about where you want to go and the kind of help you need and we’ll do our best to get you to Mexico!"]Visas For Life in Mexico

inShare
1
Mexico Immigration Laws and Application Process Summary
US PassportThe following Mexico immigration information is provided as a resource for our readers and will be updated periodically as policy and changes are made and brought to our attention. As with any government rules they can be dynamic in nature when it comes to implementation and timing.

As of August 2013, we believe the information we provide here is correct. We have also provided some additional links to other resources at the bottom of this page.

Before you get too far along please read these quick tips prior to starting any process through the Mexico Institute of National Immigration INM website.

Do not click on the “English” option at the top of the page because that will take you to the “Home” page which is the only page with the English option. We suggest using Google Translate which does a nice job of making the form and instructions usable for English-speakers.

To obtain, renew or change your immigration status, you must start here by filling out an online application, being accepted and receiving a NUE.

IF you have not previously had an extended immigration status in Mexico, like and FM2 or FM3 you MUST begin your temporal application process through a Mexican consulate in your home country. You cannot apply within Mexico with a tourist visa.

Mexico’s Immigration Rules as of August, 2013
Beginning on November 1, 2012, four new status categories were created and the old FM2 or FM3, immigrant or non-immigrant statuses have mostly expired. However, all current FM2 and FM3 statuses will remain valid until their expiration dates and people holding current FM2′s and FM3′s will only have to comply with the new rules when they apply for renewals under the new system when they will receive the new ID cards, called “Tarjeta de Residencia”.

“Visitante”
The first status category is “Visitante”. This status encompasses non-working visitors (a typical tourist), working visitors, visitors for adoptions and humanitarians. It’s valid for 6 months and visitors have to leave the country within 6 months. These permits will still be handed out from the airlines, ship, or at the border. It’s important to keep your tourist visa with your passport.

If a tourist wants to upgrade their status to Residente Temporal or Residente Permanente, they will have to leave the country after 180 days and apply from their home country. INM is expected to release the new regulations to explain how tourists can begin the residency application process by applying online or at their Mexican Consulate.

“Residente Temporal”
The second status category is “Residente Temporal”. This status is similar to the old FM2 and FM3. With this status, temporary residents may enter and leave the country as many times as they like. Obtaining a work visa is possible and there is a 4 year limit. Foreigners who have obtained this status meet qualification characteristics such as a financial officer, investor, professional position of trust such as teacher or doctor, scientist, technical expert, artist or sports athlete. There are more characteristics as well such those seeking political asylum and refugees.

“Residente Temporal Estudiante”
Exchange students, researchers, and educators make up the third status category of “Residente Temporal Estudiante”.

“Residente Permanente”
The fourth status is “Residente Permanente” and means you have “No Immigrant” status. With this status you may stay Insurance for Mexicoin the country indefinitely, you have the right to work, and you do not have to renew your status. Permanent residency can be granted after 4 years of Temporary Residency vs. the current 5 year requirement.

Residents may also gain Permanent residency through 2 years of marriage or a common law relationship with a Mexican citizen. However, permanent residency also depends on the applicant successfully completing 2 years of temporary residency concurrent with the marriage.

Foreigners will also be able to apply for permanent residency through a point system. If an applicant has enough points based on level of education, work experience, skills in the development of science and technology, international surveys, and other professional areas, they may apply for permanent residency before the 4 years is up.



How The New Residency Statuses Affect Importing A Car
Aduana is the agency that dictates auto import issues. Once the new statuses are in force, the auto permits will line up with the new statuses. Until the new statuses are in full force, there may be an amnesty period to allow foreigners to resolve any issues with permits. There are also regions of Mexico where permits are not required like Baja and parts of Sonora.

You can expect an update on the formal rules soon but it will be tied to your immigration status as this was a recent change made with aduana just 2 years ago.

The Paperwork
As with all processes involving any brand of government, you will need documentation. To obtain/renew your Mexican visa, you will need to provide:
a) A Letter addressed to your local INM office Delegado requesting the type of visa your would like to apply for.

Proof of Income
Residente Temporal applicants must submit documents proving they they meet one of the following requirements with their applications:

Original and copy of proof of investments or bank accounts with average monthly balance equivalent to 20,000 days of the minimum wage in the Federal District during the last twelve months or
Original and copies of documents showing monthly employment or unencumbered pension income greater than 400 days of the minimum wage in the Federal District, for the past six months.
The legal minimum daily wage in the Federal District in 2012 is 62.33 pesos, so 400 times that is 24,932 pesos, or $1,890 dollars at today’s exchange rate of 13.19 pesos to the dollar. This amount is increased by 50% for each dependent. A married couple applying for the new Residente Temporal visa are required to have a minimum monthly income of $2,835.00

20,000 days minimum wage is 1,246,600 pesos, or $94,500 dollars.

An applicant for Residente Permanente must show either the same 20,000 days minimum wage in investments or a monthly employment or pension income of 500 times the minimum wage. That would be $2,365 dollars per month of income. A married couple would require $3,548 per month of income.

Proof of sufficient monthly income, as per the chart below (2013 Federal District minimum wage [“FDMW”]= 64.76 MXN; exchange rate used = 13.19 MXN/$1)

Visa Type

Produce documentation showing

In Pesos

In Dollars

Residente Temporal
Monthly income of:

400 X FDMW

$24,932 MXN

$1,890 USD

Avg daily acct balance of:

20,000 X FDMW

$1,246,600 MXN

$94,500 USD

Residente Permanente
Monthly income of:

500 X FDMW

$31,194 MXN

$2,365 USD

Avg daily acct balance of:

25,000 X FDMW

$1,708,000 MXN

$129,520 USD



Proof of Address
c) Proof of Mexico address, such as a utility bill (does not have to be in your name), or bank statement (in your name).

d) Three photos in color, passport style and a profile – two front and one side, with the ears and forehead uncovered, without jewelry and glasses. (most local immigration offices have photo services located adjacent or near them).

e) A letter of application (from INM internet site), or the “NUE” number of your application; however, a copy of the accepted application with the NUE number is best.

f) Original and copies of US passport, and any recent INM visa, or FMM (tourist) paperwork.

g) For your first application, also bring your birth certificate and marriage license (if appropriate) and, of course, a copy or 2 of each.

As a precaution against having to make a second or third trip to INM office, we suggest having two copies of everything. DO NOT expect the Immigration office to make copies of anything, you must provide your own photo copies of all documents requested.

After the first time application, proof of income and residency will no longer be required for the following three years or until your renewal date (if less than 4 years). Instead, what is required is a letter signed by the visa holder that all information on the original application is still valid. There will be no renewals required of a permanent visa card and it will allow working.

The regulations for the new immigration law (la ley aduana) went into effect November 10, 2012,. The current fees are:

Pesos

Visa

Fee

Residente Temporal

3,130 MXN/1 year

4,690 MXN/2 years

5,940 MXN/3 years

7,040 MXN/4 years

Residente Permanente

3,815 MXN one time

The link to check on the status of your application is:Currently, the link to apply for Residente Temporal is: Migrantes - Instituto Nacional de Migración

Seguimiento de Trámite - Instituto Nacional de Migración

Our friends at Yucalandia have a great blog post on more of the specifics and how to figure the income requirements…make sure to check that for the details; the income requirements are towards the bottom of this article.

Additional resources and Mexican attorney interpretations of the new immigration laws in Mexico 2012-2013 Linked Here

Mexico Visa FAQ’s
What is the difference between Temporal and Permanente? Temporal is good for up to four years with a fee for each year (payable each year, or in any combination, or as a one-time fee). After four years on a Temporal Visa, you must change to a Permanente.
Permanente permits you to live in Mexico indefinitely with a one-time fee, after four years residence.
Do the years under the FM system count toward the Residente visas? Yes
What are the time options for each visa?
Temporal: 1 to 4 years

Permanente: No limit

Changing from an FM visa to a Permanente (or Temporal) can be done in Mexico? Yes, if you have had an FM2 or 3 for 4 years.
What are the income requirements when dealing with a husband and a wife, and/or family? On, combined incomes? It can be if you want; for instance, if only one of you has the basic qualifying income, or account balance.To include a spouse, or any other qualifying family member, you add 100 to the number of days required for the valid Residente visa – per person. You will also need documentation proving the relationship (i.e., an apostilled marriage license).To add your spouse to your Residente Temporal, you add 100 to the 400 days of FDMW. So, for you to qualify as a couple, you need 500 days of FDMW or, $32,380 MXN, or $2590 USD income per month.For all other purposes, a “family” visa adjunct is treated individually.
Viva Mexico!
Need More VISA Information?

We have been through the process here in Mexico a few times and have found some great resources. Tell us a little bit about where you want to go and the kind of help you need and we’ll do our best to get you to Mexico![/URL]


Mexico Immigration Laws and Application Process Summary
US PassportThe following Mexico immigration information is provided as a resource for our readers and will be updated periodically as policy and changes are made and brought to our attention. As with any government rules they can be dynamic in nature when it comes to implementation and timing.

As of August 2013, we believe the information we provide here is correct. We have also provided some additional links to other resources at the bottom of this page.

Before you get too far along please read these quick tips prior to starting any process through the Mexico Institute of National Immigration INM website.

Do not click on the “English” option at the top of the page because that will take you to the “Home” page which is the only page with the English option. We suggest using Google Translate which does a nice job of making the form and instructions usable for English-speakers.

To obtain, renew or change your immigration status, you must start here by filling out an online application, being accepted and receiving a NUE.

IF you have not previously had an extended immigration status in Mexico, like and FM2 or FM3 you MUST begin your temporal application process through a Mexican consulate in your home country. You cannot apply within Mexico with a tourist visa.

Mexico’s Immigration Rules as of August, 2013
Beginning on November 1, 2012, four new status categories were created and the old FM2 or FM3, immigrant or non-immigrant statuses have mostly expired. However, all current FM2 and FM3 statuses will remain valid until their expiration dates and people holding current FM2′s and FM3′s will only have to comply with the new rules when they apply for renewals under the new system when they will receive the new ID cards, called “Tarjeta de Residencia”.

“Visitante”
The first status category is “Visitante”. This status encompasses non-working visitors (a typical tourist), working visitors, visitors for adoptions and humanitarians. It’s valid for 6 months and visitors have to leave the country within 6 months. These permits will still be handed out from the airlines, ship, or at the border. It’s important to keep your tourist visa with your passport.

If a tourist wants to upgrade their status to Residente Temporal or Residente Permanente, they will have to leave the country after 180 days and apply from their home country. INM is expected to release the new regulations to explain how tourists can begin the residency application process by applying online or at their Mexican Consulate.

“Residente Temporal”
The second status category is “Residente Temporal”. This status is similar to the old FM2 and FM3. With this status, temporary residents may enter and leave the country as many times as they like. Obtaining a work visa is possible and there is a 4 year limit. Foreigners who have obtained this status meet qualification characteristics such as a financial officer, investor, professional position of trust such as teacher or doctor, scientist, technical expert, artist or sports athlete. There are more characteristics as well such those seeking political asylum and refugees.

“Residente Temporal Estudiante”
Exchange students, researchers, and educators make up the third status category of “Residente Temporal Estudiante”.

“Residente Permanente”
The fourth status is “Residente Permanente” and means you have “No Immigrant” status. With this status you may stay Insurance for Mexicoin the country indefinitely, you have the right to work, and you do not have to renew your status. Permanent residency can be granted after 4 years of Temporary Residency vs. the current 5 year requirement.

Residents may also gain Permanent residency through 2 years of marriage or a common law relationship with a Mexican citizen. However, permanent residency also depends on the applicant successfully completing 2 years of temporary residency concurrent with the marriage.

Foreigners will also be able to apply for permanent residency through a point system. If an applicant has enough points based on level of education, work experience, skills in the development of science and technology, international surveys, and other professional areas, they may apply for permanent residency before the 4 years is up.



How The New Residency Statuses Affect Importing A Car
Aduana is the agency that dictates auto import issues. Once the new statuses are in force, the auto permits will line up with the new statuses. Until the new statuses are in full force, there may be an amnesty period to allow foreigners to resolve any issues with permits. There are also regions of Mexico where permits are not required like Baja and parts of Sonora.

You can expect an update on the formal rules soon but it will be tied to your immigration status as this was a recent change made with aduana just 2 years ago.

The Paperwork
As with all processes involving any brand of government, you will need documentation. To obtain/renew your Mexican visa, you will need to provide:
a) A Letter addressed to your local INM office Delegado requesting the type of visa your would like to apply for.

Proof of Income
Residente Temporal applicants must submit documents proving they they meet one of the following requirements with their applications:

Original and copy of proof of investments or bank accounts with average monthly balance equivalent to 20,000 days of the minimum wage in the Federal District during the last twelve months or
Original and copies of documents showing monthly employment or unencumbered pension income greater than 400 days of the minimum wage in the Federal District, for the past six months.
The legal minimum daily wage in the Federal District in 2012 is 62.33 pesos, so 400 times that is 24,932 pesos, or $1,890 dollars at today’s exchange rate of 13.19 pesos to the dollar. This amount is increased by 50% for each dependent. A married couple applying for the new Residente Temporal visa are required to have a minimum monthly income of $2,835.00

20,000 days minimum wage is 1,246,600 pesos, or $94,500 dollars.

An applicant for Residente Permanente must show either the same 20,000 days minimum wage in investments or a monthly employment or pension income of 500 times the minimum wage. That would be $2,365 dollars per month of income. A married couple would require $3,548 per month of income.

Proof of sufficient monthly income, as per the chart below (2013 Federal District minimum wage [“FDMW”]= 64.76 MXN; exchange rate used = 13.19 MXN/$1)

Visa Type

Produce documentation showing

In Pesos

In Dollars

Residente Temporal
Monthly income of:

400 X FDMW

$24,932 MXN

$1,890 USD

Avg daily acct balance of:

20,000 X FDMW

$1,246,600 MXN

$94,500 USD

Residente Permanente
Monthly income of:

500 X FDMW

$31,194 MXN

$2,365 USD

Avg daily acct balance of:

25,000 X FDMW

$1,708,000 MXN

$129,520 USD



Proof of Address
c) Proof of Mexico address, such as a utility bill (does not have to be in your name), or bank statement (in your name).

d) Three photos in color, passport style and a profile – two front and one side, with the ears and forehead uncovered, without jewelry and glasses. (most local immigration offices have photo services located adjacent or near them).

e) A letter of application (from INM internet site), or the “NUE” number of your application; however, a copy of the accepted application with the NUE number is best.

f) Original and copies of US passport, and any recent INM visa, or FMM (tourist) paperwork.

g) For your first application, also bring your birth certificate and marriage license (if appropriate) and, of course, a copy or 2 of each.

As a precaution against having to make a second or third trip to INM office, we suggest having two copies of everything. DO NOT expect the Immigration office to make copies of anything, you must provide your own photo copies of all documents requested.

After the first time application, proof of income and residency will no longer be required for the following three years or until your renewal date (if less than 4 years). Instead, what is required is a letter signed by the visa holder that all information on the original application is still valid. There will be no renewals required of a permanent visa card and it will allow working.

The regulations for the new immigration law (la ley aduana) went into effect November 10, 2012,. The current fees are:

Pesos

Visa

Fee

Residente Temporal

3,130 MXN/1 year

4,690 MXN/2 years

5,940 MXN/3 years

7,040 MXN/4 years

Residente Permanente

3,815 MXN one time

The link to check on the status of your application is:Currently, the link to apply for Residente Temporal is: Migrantes - Instituto Nacional de Migración

Seguimiento de Trámite - Instituto Nacional de Migración

Our friends at Yucalandia have a great blog post on more of the specifics and how to figure the income requirements…make sure to check that for the details; the income requirements are towards the bottom of this article.

Additional resources and Mexican attorney interpretations of the new immigration laws in Mexico 2012-2013 Linked Here

Mexico Visa FAQ’s
What is the difference between Temporal and Permanente? Temporal is good for up to four years with a fee for each year (payable each year, or in any combination, or as a one-time fee). After four years on a Temporal Visa, you must change to a Permanente.
Permanente permits you to live in Mexico indefinitely with a one-time fee, after four years residence.
Do the years under the FM system count toward the Residente visas? Yes
What are the time options for each visa?
Temporal: 1 to 4 years

Permanente: No limit

Changing from an FM visa to a Permanente (or Temporal) can be done in Mexico? Yes, if you have had an FM2 or 3 for 4 years.
What are the income requirements when dealing with a husband and a wife, and/or family? On, combined incomes? It can be if you want; for instance, if only one of you has the basic qualifying income, or account balance.To include a spouse, or any other qualifying family member, you add 100 to the number of days required for the valid Residente visa – per person. You will also need documentation proving the relationship (i.e., an apostilled marriage license).To add your spouse to your Residente Temporal, you add 100 to the 400 days of FDMW. So, for you to qualify as a couple, you need 500 days of FDMW or, $32,380 MXN, or $2590 USD income per month.For all other purposes, a “family” visa adjunct is treated individually.
Viva Mexico!
Need More VISA Information?

We have been through the process here in Mexico a few times and have found some great resources. Tell us a little bit about where you want to go and the kind of help you need and we’ll do our best to get you to Mexico!"]http://Visas For Life in Mexico

inShare
1
Mexico Immigration Laws and Application Process Summary
US PassportThe following Mexico immigration information is provided as a resource for our readers and will be updated periodically as policy and changes are made and brought to our attention. As with any government rules they can be dynamic in nature when it comes to implementation and timing.

As of August 2013, we believe the information we provide here is correct. We have also provided some additional links to other resources at the bottom of this page.

Before you get too far along please read these quick tips prior to starting any process through the Mexico Institute of National Immigration INM website.

Do not click on the “English” option at the top of the page because that will take you to the “Home” page which is the only page with the English option. We suggest using Google Translate which does a nice job of making the form and instructions usable for English-speakers.

To obtain, renew or change your immigration status, you must start here by filling out an online application, being accepted and receiving a NUE.

IF you have not previously had an extended immigration status in Mexico, like and FM2 or FM3 you MUST begin your temporal application process through a Mexican consulate in your home country. You cannot apply within Mexico with a tourist visa.

Mexico’s Immigration Rules as of August, 2013
Beginning on November 1, 2012, four new status categories were created and the old FM2 or FM3, immigrant or non-immigrant statuses have mostly expired. However, all current FM2 and FM3 statuses will remain valid until their expiration dates and people holding current FM2′s and FM3′s will only have to comply with the new rules when they apply for renewals under the new system when they will receive the new ID cards, called “Tarjeta de Residencia”.

“Visitante”
The first status category is “Visitante”. This status encompasses non-working visitors (a typical tourist), working visitors, visitors for adoptions and humanitarians. It’s valid for 6 months and visitors have to leave the country within 6 months. These permits will still be handed out from the airlines, ship, or at the border. It’s important to keep your tourist visa with your passport.

If a tourist wants to upgrade their status to Residente Temporal or Residente Permanente, they will have to leave the country after 180 days and apply from their home country. INM is expected to release the new regulations to explain how tourists can begin the residency application process by applying online or at their Mexican Consulate.

“Residente Temporal”
The second status category is “Residente Temporal”. This status is similar to the old FM2 and FM3. With this status, temporary residents may enter and leave the country as many times as they like. Obtaining a work visa is possible and there is a 4 year limit. Foreigners who have obtained this status meet qualification characteristics such as a financial officer, investor, professional position of trust such as teacher or doctor, scientist, technical expert, artist or sports athlete. There are more characteristics as well such those seeking political asylum and refugees.

“Residente Temporal Estudiante”
Exchange students, researchers, and educators make up the third status category of “Residente Temporal Estudiante”.

“Residente Permanente”
The fourth status is “Residente Permanente” and means you have “No Immigrant” status. With this status you may stay Insurance for Mexicoin the country indefinitely, you have the right to work, and you do not have to renew your status. Permanent residency can be granted after 4 years of Temporary Residency vs. the current 5 year requirement.

Residents may also gain Permanent residency through 2 years of marriage or a common law relationship with a Mexican citizen. However, permanent residency also depends on the applicant successfully completing 2 years of temporary residency concurrent with the marriage.

Foreigners will also be able to apply for permanent residency through a point system. If an applicant has enough points based on level of education, work experience, skills in the development of science and technology, international surveys, and other professional areas, they may apply for permanent residency before the 4 years is up.



How The New Residency Statuses Affect Importing A Car
Aduana is the agency that dictates auto import issues. Once the new statuses are in force, the auto permits will line up with the new statuses. Until the new statuses are in full force, there may be an amnesty period to allow foreigners to resolve any issues with permits. There are also regions of Mexico where permits are not required like Baja and parts of Sonora.

You can expect an update on the formal rules soon but it will be tied to your immigration status as this was a recent change made with aduana just 2 years ago.

The Paperwork
As with all processes involving any brand of government, you will need documentation. To obtain/renew your Mexican visa, you will need to provide:
a) A Letter addressed to your local INM office Delegado requesting the type of visa your would like to apply for.

Proof of Income
Residente Temporal applicants must submit documents proving they they meet one of the following requirements with their applications:

Original and copy of proof of investments or bank accounts with average monthly balance equivalent to 20,000 days of the minimum wage in the Federal District during the last twelve months or
Original and copies of documents showing monthly employment or unencumbered pension income greater than 400 days of the minimum wage in the Federal District, for the past six months.
The legal minimum daily wage in the Federal District in 2012 is 62.33 pesos, so 400 times that is 24,932 pesos, or $1,890 dollars at today’s exchange rate of 13.19 pesos to the dollar. This amount is increased by 50% for each dependent. A married couple applying for the new Residente Temporal visa are required to have a minimum monthly income of $2,835.00

20,000 days minimum wage is 1,246,600 pesos, or $94,500 dollars.

An applicant for Residente Permanente must show either the same 20,000 days minimum wage in investments or a monthly employment or pension income of 500 times the minimum wage. That would be $2,365 dollars per month of income. A married couple would require $3,548 per month of income.

Proof of sufficient monthly income, as per the chart below (2013 Federal District minimum wage [“FDMW”]= 64.76 MXN; exchange rate used = 13.19 MXN/$1)

Visa Type

Produce documentation showing

In Pesos

In Dollars

Residente Temporal
Monthly income of:

400 X FDMW

$24,932 MXN

$1,890 USD

Avg daily acct balance of:

20,000 X FDMW

$1,246,600 MXN

$94,500 USD

Residente Permanente
Monthly income of:

500 X FDMW

$31,194 MXN

$2,365 USD

Avg daily acct balance of:

25,000 X FDMW

$1,708,000 MXN

$129,520 USD



Proof of Address
c) Proof of Mexico address, such as a utility bill (does not have to be in your name), or bank statement (in your name).

d) Three photos in color, passport style and a profile – two front and one side, with the ears and forehead uncovered, without jewelry and glasses. (most local immigration offices have photo services located adjacent or near them).

e) A letter of application (from INM internet site), or the “NUE” number of your application; however, a copy of the accepted application with the NUE number is best.

f) Original and copies of US passport, and any recent INM visa, or FMM (tourist) paperwork.

g) For your first application, also bring your birth certificate and marriage license (if appropriate) and, of course, a copy or 2 of each.

As a precaution against having to make a second or third trip to INM office, we suggest having two copies of everything. DO NOT expect the Immigration office to make copies of anything, you must provide your own photo copies of all documents requested.

After the first time application, proof of income and residency will no longer be required for the following three years or until your renewal date (if less than 4 years). Instead, what is required is a letter signed by the visa holder that all information on the original application is still valid. There will be no renewals required of a permanent visa card and it will allow working.

The regulations for the new immigration law (la ley aduana) went into effect November 10, 2012,. The current fees are:

Pesos

Visa

Fee

Residente Temporal

3,130 MXN/1 year

4,690 MXN/2 years

5,940 MXN/3 years

7,040 MXN/4 years

Residente Permanente

3,815 MXN one time

The link to check on the status of your application is:Currently, the link to apply for Residente Temporal is: Migrantes - Instituto Nacional de Migración

Seguimiento de Trámite - Instituto Nacional de Migración

Our friends at Yucalandia have a great blog post on more of the specifics and how to figure the income requirements…make sure to check that for the details; the income requirements are towards the bottom of this article.

Additional resources and Mexican attorney interpretations of the new immigration laws in Mexico 2012-2013 Linked Here

Mexico Visa FAQ’s
What is the difference between Temporal and Permanente? Temporal is good for up to four years with a fee for each year (payable each year, or in any combination, or as a one-time fee). After four years on a Temporal Visa, you must change to a Permanente.
Permanente permits you to live in Mexico indefinitely with a one-time fee, after four years residence.
Do the years under the FM system count toward the Residente visas? Yes
What are the time options for each visa?
Temporal: 1 to 4 years

Permanente: No limit

Changing from an FM visa to a Permanente (or Temporal) can be done in Mexico? Yes, if you have had an FM2 or 3 for 4 years.
What are the income requirements when dealing with a husband and a wife, and/or family? On, combined incomes? It can be if you want; for instance, if only one of you has the basic qualifying income, or account balance.To include a spouse, or any other qualifying family member, you add 100 to the number of days required for the valid Residente visa – per person. You will also need documentation proving the relationship (i.e., an apostilled marriage license).To add your spouse to your Residente Temporal, you add 100 to the 400 days of FDMW. So, for you to qualify as a couple, you need 500 days of FDMW or, $32,380 MXN, or $2590 USD income per month.For all other purposes, a “family” visa adjunct is treated individually.
Viva Mexico!
Need More VISA Information?

We have been through the process here in Mexico a few times and have found some great resources. Tell us a little bit about where you want to go and the kind of help you need and we’ll do our best to get you to Mexico![/URL]
Visas For Life in Mexico

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Mexico Immigration Laws and Application Process Summary
US PassportThe following Mexico immigration information is provided as a resource for our readers and will be updated periodically as policy and changes are made and brought to our attention. As with any government rules they can be dynamic in nature when it comes to implementation and timing.

As of August 2013, we believe the information we provide here is correct. We have also provided some additional links to other resources at the bottom of this page.

Before you get too far along please read these quick tips prior to starting any process through the Mexico Institute of National Immigration INM website.

Do not click on the “English” option at the top of the page because that will take you to the “Home” page which is the only page with the English option. We suggest using Google Translate which does a nice job of making the form and instructions usable for English-speakers.

To obtain, renew or change your immigration status, you must start here by filling out an online application, being accepted and receiving a NUE.

IF you have not previously had an extended immigration status in Mexico, like and FM2 or FM3 you MUST begin your temporal application process through a Mexican consulate in your home country. You cannot apply within Mexico with a tourist visa.

Mexico’s Immigration Rules as of August, 2013
Beginning on November 1, 2012, four new status categories were created and the old FM2 or FM3, immigrant or non-immigrant statuses have mostly expired. However, all current FM2 and FM3 statuses will remain valid until their expiration dates and people holding current FM2′s and FM3′s will only have to comply with the new rules when they apply for renewals under the new system when they will receive the new ID cards, called “Tarjeta de Residencia”.

“Visitante”
The first status category is “Visitante”. This status encompasses non-working visitors (a typical tourist), working visitors, visitors for adoptions and humanitarians. It’s valid for 6 months and visitors have to leave the country within 6 months. These permits will still be handed out from the airlines, ship, or at the border. It’s important to keep your tourist visa with your passport.

If a tourist wants to upgrade their status to Residente Temporal or Residente Permanente, they will have to leave the country after 180 days and apply from their home country. INM is expected to release the new regulations to explain how tourists can begin the residency application process by applying online or at their Mexican Consulate.

“Residente Temporal”
The second status category is “Residente Temporal”. This status is similar to the old FM2 and FM3. With this status, temporary residents may enter and leave the country as many times as they like. Obtaining a work visa is possible and there is a 4 year limit. Foreigners who have obtained this status meet qualification characteristics such as a financial officer, investor, professional position of trust such as teacher or doctor, scientist, technical expert, artist or sports athlete. There are more characteristics as well such those seeking political asylum and refugees.

“Residente Temporal Estudiante”
Exchange students, researchers, and educators make up the third status category of “Residente Temporal Estudiante”.

“Residente Permanente”
The fourth status is “Residente Permanente” and means you have “No Immigrant” status. With this status you may stay Insurance for Mexicoin the country indefinitely, you have the right to work, and you do not have to renew your status. Permanent residency can be granted after 4 years of Temporary Residency vs. the current 5 year requirement.

Residents may also gain Permanent residency through 2 years of marriage or a common law relationship with a Mexican citizen. However, permanent residency also depends on the applicant successfully completing 2 years of temporary residency concurrent with the marriage.

Foreigners will also be able to apply for permanent residency through a point system. If an applicant has enough points based on level of education, work experience, skills in the development of science and technology, international surveys, and other professional areas, they may apply for permanent residency before the 4 years is up.



How The New Residency Statuses Affect Importing A Car
Aduana is the agency that dictates auto import issues. Once the new statuses are in force, the auto permits will line up with the new statuses. Until the new statuses are in full force, there may be an amnesty period to allow foreigners to resolve any issues with permits. There are also regions of Mexico where permits are not required like Baja and parts of Sonora.

You can expect an update on the formal rules soon but it will be tied to your immigration status as this was a recent change made with aduana just 2 years ago.

The Paperwork
As with all processes involving any brand of government, you will need documentation. To obtain/renew your Mexican visa, you will need to provide:
a) A Letter addressed to your local INM office Delegado requesting the type of visa your would like to apply for.

Proof of Income
Residente Temporal applicants must submit documents proving they they meet one of the following requirements with their applications:

Original and copy of proof of investments or bank accounts with average monthly balance equivalent to 20,000 days of the minimum wage in the Federal District during the last twelve months or
Original and copies of documents showing monthly employment or unencumbered pension income greater than 400 days of the minimum wage in the Federal District, for the past six months.
The legal minimum daily wage in the Federal District in 2012 is 62.33 pesos, so 400 times that is 24,932 pesos, or $1,890 dollars at today’s exchange rate of 13.19 pesos to the dollar. This amount is increased by 50% for each dependent. A married couple applying for the new Residente Temporal visa are required to have a minimum monthly income of $2,835.00

20,000 days minimum wage is 1,246,600 pesos, or $94,500 dollars.

An applicant for Residente Permanente must show either the same 20,000 days minimum wage in investments or a monthly employment or pension income of 500 times the minimum wage. That would be $2,365 dollars per month of income. A married couple would require $3,548 per month of income.

Proof of sufficient monthly income, as per the chart below (2013 Federal District minimum wage [“FDMW”]= 64.76 MXN; exchange rate used = 13.19 MXN/$1)

Visa Type

Produce documentation showing

In Pesos

In Dollars

Residente Temporal
Monthly income of:

400 X FDMW

$24,932 MXN

$1,890 USD

Avg daily acct balance of:

20,000 X FDMW

$1,246,600 MXN

$94,500 USD

Residente Permanente
Monthly income of:

500 X FDMW

$31,194 MXN

$2,365 USD

Avg daily acct balance of:

25,000 X FDMW

$1,708,000 MXN

$129,520 USD



Proof of Address
c) Proof of Mexico address, such as a utility bill (does not have to be in your name), or bank statement (in your name).

d) Three photos in color, passport style and a profile – two front and one side, with the ears and forehead uncovered, without jewelry and glasses. (most local immigration offices have photo services located adjacent or near them).

e) A letter of application (from INM internet site), or the “NUE” number of your application; however, a copy of the accepted application with the NUE number is best.

f) Original and copies of US passport, and any recent INM visa, or FMM (tourist) paperwork.

g) For your first application, also bring your birth certificate and marriage license (if appropriate) and, of course, a copy or 2 of each.

As a precaution against having to make a second or third trip to INM office, we suggest having two copies of everything. DO NOT expect the Immigration office to make copies of anything, you must provide your own photo copies of all documents requested.

After the first time application, proof of income and residency will no longer be required for the following three years or until your renewal date (if less than 4 years). Instead, what is required is a letter signed by the visa holder that all information on the original application is still valid. There will be no renewals required of a permanent visa card and it will allow working.

The regulations for the new immigration law (la ley aduana) went into effect November 10, 2012,. The current fees are:

Pesos

Visa

Fee

Residente Temporal

3,130 MXN/1 year

4,690 MXN/2 years

5,940 MXN/3 years

7,040 MXN/4 years

Residente Permanente

3,815 MXN one time

The link to check on the status of your application is:Currently, the link to apply for Residente Temporal is: Migrantes - Instituto Nacional de Migración

Seguimiento de Trámite - Instituto Nacional de Migración

Our friends at Yucalandia have a great blog post on more of the specifics and how to figure the income requirements…make sure to check that for the details; the income requirements are towards the bottom of this article.

Additional resources and Mexican attorney interpretations of the new immigration laws in Mexico 2012-2013 Linked Here

Mexico Visa FAQ’s
What is the difference between Temporal and Permanente? Temporal is good for up to four years with a fee for each year (payable each year, or in any combination, or as a one-time fee). After four years on a Temporal Visa, you must change to a Permanente.
Permanente permits you to live in Mexico indefinitely with a one-time fee, after four years residence.
Do the years under the FM system count toward the Residente visas? Yes
What are the time options for each visa?
Temporal: 1 to 4 years

Permanente: No limit

Changing from an FM visa to a Permanente (or Temporal) can be done in Mexico? Yes, if you have had an FM2 or 3 for 4 years.
What are the income requirements when dealing with a husband and a wife, and/or family? On, combined incomes? It can be if you want; for instance, if only one of you has the basic qualifying income, or account balance.To include a spouse, or any other qualifying family member, you add 100 to the number of days required for the valid Residente visa – per person. You will also need documentation proving the relationship (i.e., an apostilled marriage license).To add your spouse to your Residente Temporal, you add 100 to the 400 days of FDMW. So, for you to qualify as a couple, you need 500 days of FDMW or, $32,380 MXN, or $2590 USD income per month.For all other purposes, a “family” visa adjunct is treated individually.
Viva Mexico!
Need More VISA Information?

We have been through the process here in Mexico a few times and have found some great resources. Tell us a little bit about where you want to go and the kind of help you need and we’ll do our best to get you to Mexico!
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Old 22-09-2013, 09:03   #2
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Re: the real deal regarding mexican visas...

Ah, the Mexico and its Byzantine bureaucracy. And that wall of words above is why people get black-market visas. I wonder sometimes if the Mexican government intentionally makes things difficult to encourage morbida.

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Old 22-09-2013, 09:15   #3
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Re: the real deal regarding mexican visas...

i have found this to be easier than the former method of going thru allthe used to be motions.

advertising the obtaining of black market visas is going to get everyone in trouble--why are you condoning this when you have a license to lose in the manner...isnt cool..
being illegal can get you permanently kicked out of mexico--and keep saying this place is archaic--it is in better condition than is usa at present. this is not a place for debate--condoning unlawful procedure is asking for problems.
enjoy your illegality.


for those who choose the proper and lawful manner---i have posted it.

for those interested in flouting law-- good luck. these folks are not as backwards as you believe them to be--but then, you have yet to come to mexico. baja is not mexico, nor is la cruz de huanacaxtle.

i have found migracion to be more than generous in their dealings with the arrogant and the meek alike--they are good souls who are doing a job--and this mexican migra is so much easier than coming to usa as a foreigner.

and the proper word is MORDIDA which means BITE
mexico is trying to discontinue mordida in federal govt --is why the universality of visa regulation.


mexican officials will work with you on this procedure. they are not single-minded senseless bureaucrats. but then you must be able to work with them with an open mind, not be bigoted and prejudiced against them. you will be surprised what you can gain by being considerate..
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Old 22-09-2013, 09:29   #4
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Re: the real deal regarding mexican visas...

Good grief! You guys be careful down there.
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Old 22-09-2013, 09:35   #5
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Re: the real deal regarding mexican visas...

Quote:
Originally Posted by zeehag View Post
i have found this to be easier than the former method of going thru allthe used to be motions.

advertising the obtaining of black market visas is going to get everyone in trouble--why are you condoning this when you have a license to lose in the manner...isnt cool..
being illegal can get you permanently kicked out of mexico--and keep saying this place is archaic--it is in better condition than is usa at present. this is not a place for debate--condoning unlawful procedure is asking for problems.
enjoy your illegality.


for those who choose the proper and lawful manner---i have posted it.

for those interested in flouting law-- good luck. these folks are not as backwards as you believe them to be--but then, you have yet to come to mexico. baja is not mexico, nor is la cruz de huanacaxtle.

i have found migracion to be more than generous in their dealings with the arrogant and the meek alike--they are good souls who are doing a job--and this mexican migra is so much easier than coming to usa as a foreigner.

and the proper word is MORDIDA which means BITE
mexico is trying to discontinue mordida in federal govt --is why the universality of visa regulation.
I would like to belive that Mexico is doing better and that the rule of law is commen place ,But my thoughts and experiance are that the place is fussed up and one man says one thing and in another place they say something else("Baja is not Mexico" so true and the only place I found to be Mexico is Mexico cuidad(?) every state I have been in (most) are all like little countrys within a country...Good work you have done posting this but I am still gun shy about thinking I could trust this to be true everywhere in Mex.
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Old 22-09-2013, 09:36   #6
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Re: the real deal regarding mexican visas...

it is very easy to maintain legality here .

there is no need for illegal means--it is for us to set a good example and be within out legal alleged rights, which are actually better here than in usa at present, a smexico does not consider their population terroritsts as does usa.
of course, if all cruisers think along illegalities being good, then they may just make this procedure more difficult than it needs to be--there are bad apples in each barrel, and those do make squawk when they fail in their illegal doings.

te--they are doing a very good jobin making universal these rules an regulations--i have experienced no difficulty in visa renewal here ---i have been here thru 2 renewals of my fm3 and my tavel visa which nis now known as fmm. i have yet to even consider the feeling of needing to be illegal in a nation wherefrom one can be expelled sans boat and life. give mexico a chance--they ar eles corrupt than is usa at this time.i trust mexico mor ethan my own country oforigin now--ths is easy.
mexico want sour business and realizes to gain it, they must change--they are so doing. we need to support this not illegality
funny how those of us who do not have the finances to travel the path every year manage to so do and those with enough money to do the trek are so verbal against it.
also seems most of the folks who expatriate are willing to do the extra bits to maintain that edge of legality, and those who dont give a damn will do whatever thay can to take advantage of a situation. there are bad apples in every bushel.
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Old 22-09-2013, 10:34   #7
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Re: the real deal regarding mexican visas...

Quote:
Originally Posted by zeehag View Post
it is very easy to maintain legality here .

there is no need for illegal means--it is for us to set a good example and be within out legal alleged rights, which are actually better here than in usa at present, a smexico does not consider their population terroritsts as does usa.
of course, if all cruisers think along illegalities being good, then they may just make this procedure more difficult than it needs to be--there are bad apples in each barrel, and those do make squawk when they fail in their illegal doings.

te--they are doing a very good jobin making universal these rules an regulations--i have experienced no difficulty in visa renewal here ---i have been here thru 2 renewals of my fm3 and my tavel visa which nis now known as fmm. i have yet to even consider the feeling of needing to be illegal in a nation wherefrom one can be expelled sans boat and life. give mexico a chance--they ar eles corrupt than is usa at this time.i trust mexico mor ethan my own country oforigin now--ths is easy.
mexico want sour business and realizes to gain it, they must change--they are so doing. we need to support this not illegality
funny how those of us who do not have the finances to travel the path every year manage to so do and those with enough money to do the trek are so verbal against it.
also seems most of the folks who expatriate are willing to do the extra bits to maintain that edge of legality, and those who dont give a damn will do whatever thay can to take advantage of a situation. there are bad apples in every bushel.
I think we shall soon see how Corrupt or not Mexico is in the next few weeks as the Gov. helps or turns its back on the towns that have been affected by the storm,there is already a bunch of stink going on about corruption being behind why so many have been killed from this storm ie. very bad roads that were recently built to a very low standard.. Graft and corruption are being blamed for the roads washing away and people being stranded and killed because they could not leave on the roads as they were shotty and folks were trapped..
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Old 22-09-2013, 11:05   #8
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Re: the real deal regarding mexican visas...

Chances are most of the officials in the Immigration offices would check half that list and if you don't have exactly what they want, they'll probably just wave you through.
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Old 22-09-2013, 12:14   #9
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Re: the real deal regarding mexican visas...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tropicalescape View Post
I think we shall soon see how Corrupt or not Mexico is in the next few weeks as the Gov. helps or turns its back on the towns that have been affected by the storm,there is already a bunch of stink going on about corruption being behind why so many have been killed from this storm ie. very bad roads that were recently built to a very low standard.. Graft and corruption are being blamed for the roads washing away and people being stranded and killed because they could not leave on the roads as they were shotty and folks were trapped..
Click image for larger version

Name:	55439_130913072144-12-colorado-flood-restricted-horizontal-gallery.jpg
Views:	206
Size:	96.4 KB
ID:	67674

Yea... Roads are washed away due to graft and corruption?

Or just the force of nature?

I think that even in the US, nature can win over a man made structure..


BTW, the attached picts are from Colorado. I was not going to even look for Florida and Gulf coast or NY post storm photos.

I am sure there is graft and corruption in Mexico. yet... when hit by a hurricane there is little that can stand up to the forces of mother nature.
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Old 22-09-2013, 14:28   #10
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Re: the real deal regarding mexican visas...

Quote:
Originally Posted by EzzyD View Post
Attachment 67674

Yea... Roads are washed away due to graft and corruption?

Or just the force of nature?

I think that even in the US, nature can win over a man made structure..


BTW, the attached picts are from Colorado. I was not going to even look for Florida and Gulf coast or NY post storm photos.

I am sure there is graft and corruption in Mexico. yet... when hit by a hurricane there is little that can stand up to the forces of mother nature.
The locals are saying that it was due to "corrupt politicos" building substandard roads,Presidenta Pina Nieto has said "I will look into it"!
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Old 22-09-2013, 14:29   #11
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Re: the real deal regarding mexican visas...

Longmont Westbound Lefthand - Aerial Footage 9/13/13 - YouTube
where the narrator has camera zoom in and mentions in his neighbors in niwot--that is my cousins home. he was lucky to have gotten out with his wife--they lost chickens and dogs and a goat..
doj knows abou tthe goat....
mexico doesnt have any worse problems than we do as far as corruption in construction and engineering. it is just more popular to decry the conditions in mexico because we are usa--lol--when we have a befoulment it must be shoved under a rug. no insurance pays for this in colorado.

here inbarra de navidaf, the president has pledged to rebuild malecon and popeyes---popeyes is rebuilt--beginnings of repairs on the beach-- we will see how this comes along--with a texas millionaire the work has been started and is spozed to take 2 yrs including dredging in lagoon
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Old 23-09-2013, 17:04   #12
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Re: the real deal regarding mexican visas...

being illegal can get you permanently kicked out of mexico

And being illegal in the US WILL get you all kinds of good stuff.
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Old 23-09-2013, 18:26   #13
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Re: the real deal regarding mexican visas...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Randyonr3 View Post
Not trying to start a fight Zee, Its my homeland also, just watch watch what you say,
..."just watch what you say...."

my fellow sailor....im a Canadian and love the USA and Mexico.

I believe the lady, ZEE suggested to us all a very long post of real information she has kindly shared with us on a forum we all love.

She nor I would ever "degenerate" the USA whom send her her disability after she has served her country well.

The USA is a very powerful entity whom ,maybe is not the place we think it is......nor Canada.

Please respect her and her wisdom, she and the boat Kat and the bird are there ,because she cant afford to live in the US anymore because as you may agree, my friend ...it is bought ,owned and paid for by the plutocrat's.

The USA would be a better place if it looked after its Veterans and its public service workers ,so they may not have to live in a beautiful place like MEX.

Cheers and long live the US and gawd bless Mexico....beautiful place to be.

ALL my love.
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Old 23-09-2013, 18:33   #14
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Re: The Real Deal Regarding Mexican Visas...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Randyonr3 View Post
Not trying to start a fight Zee, Its my homeland also, just watch watch what you say,
I disagree with some of what Zee said about the USA, but not all. However, she does have the absolute right to state her believes.

Further, I am going to assume that what you wrote was just poorly stated and not a threat.

Please consider apologizing to Zee and rephrasing your response.

Thank you,

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Old 23-09-2013, 18:44   #15
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Re: The Real Deal Regarding Mexican Visas...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Viking Sailor View Post
I disagree with some of what Zee said about the USA, but not all. However, she does have the absolute right to state her believes.

Further, I am going to assume that what you wrote was just poorly stated and not a threat.

Please consider apologizing to Zee and rephrasing your response.

Thank you,


I a Viking too...Son of Dod,aka David Dodson.

Im looking forward to retiring in MEX also ,because its coooold up here in Canada in the winter.

MEX is as safe and corrupt as Canada ,USA and UK,and many other beautiful places to sail and relax.

Lets get back to the OP as to how to legally stay where we want to be in the winter.

Peace be upon us all.

lets share and smile,because life is short and the world politicians are lost....in the sea of......political correctness...
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