Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 15-08-2006, 18:48   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Fort Meade, MD
Posts: 31
Reader's Digest Story of the s/v 'Emerald Jane'

Wondering if anyone has read this story before? My wife brought an article home about a cat running aground. I found it online and thought I would pass it along. It is in the July issue of Reader's Digest.

http://www.rd.com/content/openConten...ontentId=28004
__________________

__________________
Mack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-08-2006, 03:39   #2
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 25,382
Images: 240
More on the Silverwoods and the “Emerald Jane”, including photos:
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/f...1c18wreck.html
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/f...1c19wreck.html
__________________

__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-08-2006, 06:07   #3
Registered User
 
Sunspot Baby's Avatar

Join Date: May 2003
Location: New Bern, NC
Boat: Prout Manta 38' Catamaran - Sunspot Baby
Posts: 1,521
Images: 14
This just reinforces the simple rule of sailing.

Keep the water out of the boat.
Keep the boat off the ground.
Everything else can be worked out.
__________________
She took my address and my name
Put my credit to shame
Sunspot Baby, sure had a real good time
Bob Seger
Sunspot Baby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-08-2006, 16:17   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Fort Meade, MD
Posts: 31
Well, at least the wreck wasn't dramatized. I had never heard about it until the other night, but it seems like when things like this do hit the media, they are blown out of proportion. At least the articles aren't professing what a danger sailing is and that no one should go offshore because of this.

I'll bet that guy goes back to sea one day.
__________________
Mack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-08-2006, 05:58   #5
Registered User
 
Knottygirlz's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Iroquois, Ontario
Boat: Sunray 25' KnottybuoyzII
Posts: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mack
I'll bet that guy goes back to sea one day.
He already has started sailing again. I read this story a little while ago in a different publication and it had a footnote that showed him sailing and snorkling...

Lori, Rick and Shadow
__________________
Knottygirlz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2008, 23:50   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Hervey Bay Qld, Australia
Posts: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mack View Post
Wondering if anyone has read this story before? My wife brought an article home about a cat running aground. I found it online and thought I would pass it along. It is in the July issue of Reader's Digest.

Shipwrecked: "Reef!" | Action Stories | Reader's Digest
I've just started reading it yesterday. Very graphic account of running into a dry bit. Not the best book to get people interested in sailing if they haven't yet experienced it. My advice when passage making "keep to the wet side of the dry bits, keep the boat under the mast" and she'll be right mate.
__________________
Ocean Going Cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2008, 04:06   #7
Registered User
 
BlueWaterSail's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Honolulu, HI
Boat: 36' Magellan "Steady Beat"
Posts: 186


"John took a GPS reading, looked at his chart and concluded they were about seven miles from Manuae. He set the sails and the autopilot for a path he believed would keep them well clear of the island.
They sat down to dinner but were interrupted by a noise. A pin that connects the boom to the main sail had broken. They worked on it for more than an hour before lowering the main and tying the boom in place. John figured he would repair it in the morning, in daylight.
As night settled in, and the kids gathered in the main salon to watch "Drop Dead Gorgeous," Jean went to a stateroom to watch "The Road to Perdition" on a laptop computer. She was worried the boat problems would make them late to Fiji. Friends were flying in to meet them there.
John came down and told her they would get to Fiji on schedule. He had the jib up and the engines running. It was about 7 p.m.
Then they heard scraping on the bottom of the boat."

After reading the story, it appears to me that from the time the boom became disconnected from the mast, there was no one on watch until they hit the reef, drifting with the current for most of the time it would seem.

Clusters of atolls are unforgiving in this respect. And 7 miles doesn't offer much of a comfort zone.
__________________
BlueWaterSail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2008, 07:15   #8
Eternal Member
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Las Brisas Panama AGAIN!
Boat: Simpson, Catamaran, 46ft. IMAGINE
Posts: 4,512
Images: 123
The sad part of it is he saw the atoll. Then went below to eat. UNIMAGINABLE!!!!!!!
__________________
SAILING is not always a slick magazine cover!
BORROWED..No single one of is as smart as all of us!
http://sailingwithcancer.blogspot.com/
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2008, 09:40   #9
CF Adviser
 
Pelagic's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2007
Boat: Van Helleman Schooner 65ft StarGazer
Posts: 4,194
The skipper screwed up. He knows it better than anyone and it almost costs him everything near and dear to him.

But for the grace of your god and a little bit of (bad) luck, it could happen to anyone who relaxed at just the wrong moment.

At times like this I thank my lucky stars that I have been spared such a lesson and salute those who have and survived!
__________________
Pelagic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2008, 12:14   #10
Eternal Member
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Las Brisas Panama AGAIN!
Boat: Simpson, Catamaran, 46ft. IMAGINE
Posts: 4,512
Images: 123
I would have eaten my dinner in the cockpit. Isn't this a known area for misbehaved currents? We all make mistakes, but it just seems this was a simple one to avoid. Don't turn your back on that boat eating atoll when you see it.

My BEST WISHES goes to his family, and of course the skipper himself. I love the fact he is back in the water snorkeling, and I think I read he is sailing too? Bless him for the courage to get back onto the horse that threw him.....i2f
__________________
SAILING is not always a slick magazine cover!
BORROWED..No single one of is as smart as all of us!
http://sailingwithcancer.blogspot.com/
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2008, 12:55   #11
Senior Cruiser
 
Talbot's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Stavanger, Norway
Boat: Privilege 37
Posts: 3,575
Images: 30
Foolish mistakes have this tendency to bite us!

We all make them (well I do), most of the time we get away with it. Sometimes we dont. If nobody gets hurt then it is a good learning experience (but costly).
__________________
"Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors - and miss."
Robert A Heinlein
Talbot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2008, 15:37   #12
Registered User
 
cagney's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,875
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWaterSail View Post


"John took a GPS reading, looked at his chart and concluded they were about seven miles from Manuae. He set the sails and the autopilot for a path he believed would keep them well clear of the island.
They sat down to dinner but were interrupted by a noise. A pin that connects the boom to the main sail had broken. They worked on it for more than an hour before lowering the main and tying the boom in place. John figured he would repair it in the morning, in daylight.
As night settled in, and the kids gathered in the main salon to watch "Drop Dead Gorgeous," Jean went to a stateroom to watch "The Road to Perdition" on a laptop computer. She was worried the boat problems would make them late to Fiji. Friends were flying in to meet them there.
John came down and told her they would get to Fiji on schedule. He had the jib up and the engines running. It was about 7 p.m.
Then they heard scraping on the bottom of the boat."

After reading the story, it appears to me that from the time the boom became disconnected from the mast, there was no one on watch until they hit the reef, drifting with the current for most of the time it would seem.

Clusters of atolls are unforgiving in this respect. And 7 miles doesn't offer much of a comfort zone.
I did not quite recognize Manuae in the picture. This is what I found after some digging.
The picture above shows Manuae in the Cook Islands.
Manuae (also called Scilly) in western most French Polynesia,
where this incident happened,looks like this.


__________________
cagney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-09-2008, 03:01   #13
Registered User
 
BlueWaterSail's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Honolulu, HI
Boat: 36' Magellan "Steady Beat"
Posts: 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by cagney View Post
The picture above shows Manuae in the Cook Islands. Manuae (also called Scilly) in western most French Polynesia,
where this incident happened,looks like this.
You are right - I pasted the wrong one, and stand corrected.

Very treacherous, a coral reef with a diameter of around 6 miles stretching around the spit of land you can see, most likely camouflaged by the stormy seas prevailing at the time. And night was falling ...

I can't help thinking that they were in somewhat of a hurry to get to Fiji, and the skipper under pressure as a result, otherwise why do a nighttime passage through a potentially hazardous area which you unfamiliar with?
__________________
BlueWaterSail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-09-2008, 04:20   #14
Registered User
 
cagney's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,875
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueWaterSail View Post
You are right - I pasted the wrong one, and stand corrected.

Very treacherous, a coral reef with a diameter of around 6 miles stretching around the spit of land you can see, most likely camouflaged by the stormy seas prevailing at the time. And night was falling ...

I can't help thinking that they were in somewhat of a hurry to get to Fiji, and the skipper under pressure as a result, otherwise why do a nighttime passage through a potentially hazardous area which you unfamiliar with?
All these Polynesian names!!! A mix up i easily achieved.

I noticed that it was the wrong picture only because I have been to Manuae twice. Once on a copra schooner(small cargo vessel), and once on a fishing boat. Both times I had my own boat anchored in the lagoon of Maupihaa (Mopelia).

If you are in a hurry or not, to get from Raiatea to Fiji, you still have to come up with a sensible passage plan. There is no way such a plan would take you within 7 miles of Manuae night-time. Not in my book. I used to stay 25-30 miles away from atolls I did not plan to visit and heave to at similar distance to wait for daylight if I planned a landfall (if at all possible). This was pre GPS and no radar. Don't let these aids to navigation fool you into a false sense of security.

Look at the chart below. I can see two alternatives here that could work as a plan.
1. A waypoint 30 miles south of Maupihaa.
2 Pass ~10 miles S of Maupiti, 20 - 25 N of Maupihaa and then a waypoint halfway between Manuae and Motu One. There is about 40 miles between these atolls.

It could be worth considering leaving Raiatea just before sunset, and
pass through these atolls in daylight.
It is hard to find an excuse, not to have a watch on deck, especially when within 7 miles of an atoll night time. Same goes for not monitoring your progress with gps/radar.

Let this tragic incident be a warning to us all. More or less every atoll I have seen has at least one of those Japanese/Chinese/Korean fishing boats wrecked high and dry and rusty as a warning sign. I used to tell my self: "Do you really think that you are a better navigator than each and everyone of the captains on those vessels."
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	snapshot28.png
Views:	494
Size:	118.6 KB
ID:	5053  
__________________
cagney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-10-2010, 18:12   #15
Captain
 
Andy R's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Forianopolis, Brasil
Posts: 1,551
Send a message via MSN to Andy R Send a message via Skype™ to Andy R
It looks like the Silverwoods' story has been reenacted in a episode of "I shouldn't be alive". My Tivo recorded the show but I think it originally aired last week. Maybe someone can find a link to the schedule?
__________________

__________________
Andy R is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Emerald Bay Re-Opening JusDreaming Marinas 26 20-11-2009 06:49
The True Story Of Seven Twinkies (a funny story) sailone The Sailor's Confessional 31 27-10-2009 22:02
New book about the Emerald Jane SMcD The Library 0 09-07-2008 13:30
Emerald Sea Refit emeraldsea Construction, Maintenance & Refit 5 05-06-2008 13:54


Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002-2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 21:29.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.