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Old 21-05-2015, 02:03   #91
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

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Been reading this thread with interest. We went through the Suez and the Red Sea in 2008, but we did the North to South route (we were heading to Dubai to work).

We loved it, I would love to go back and spend more time there. However, at the moment, we are heading further and further East, so don't know if or when we will get the opportunity to go back.

I should say that we sail a Sadler 25 (25 foot boat) so can't carry huge amounts of diesel or stores. On our way South we stopped at Ishmalia, Suakin, Aden and Mina Salalah to stock up.

The only problem we did have was when we left Dubai in 2009 and going through the Straits of Hormuz we were harrassed by a large dhow flying the Iranian flag. No one on board was carrying guns as far as I could see, I don't believe they were pirates, I think they were curious because there was a woman at the helm of a small boat and they wanted alcohol, so they came within about 3 meters of us and I ended up turning on the VHF really loud, pointing to the tanker coming up behind us and threatening to call for help. As luck would have it, at the same time the tanker could be seen altering course towards us and an Iranian Navy helicopter buzzed the dhow and then shadowed them at least until they were out of sight of us.

The OP should look at the political situation in the region and bear in mind that wars mean refugees and people smugglers and really poor, poor people who see us, no matter what size boat we have, as rich.

We were not approached by anyone until we got to the Hanish Islands and South of them and then it was by fishermen offering us fish. I had bags made up of portions of rice, sugar, tea and biscuits to swap for fish, but no one wanted them, they were just happy to give us fish.

With the civil war in Yemen, and if it affects Aden where are you going to stop to refuel and restock? If you don't think you can carry enough diesel to motor any distance, will you be able to carry enough stores to keep going without stopping? You can stock up in Sri Lanka, but people are saying they encountered problems with corrupt officials there (once again this was a place we loved and we made really good friends with the head of customs. He would invite us to the customs house for supper and to drink the alcohol confiscated from other boats. We were there in 2010 but things change quickly).

Someone mentioned more problems in the Malaka Strait, but we came down (North to South) the Malaka Strait in July last year, the Malaysian Navy were patrolling the area (I watched them fire warning shots to stop a small fishing boat that may have been smuggling) and you can day hop along the coast if you feel unsafe travelling at night. We went from Langkawi to the South China Sea in one hit, no problems.

This year with the boat people I imagine the Navy are patrolling the area even more.

Langkawi and Phuket are where a large number of boats stopped because they didn't want to risk the Red Sea or the route round South Africa. These boats go up and down the Malaka Strait several times a year with little or no problems. There are also rallies if you feel more comfortable going with a rally (East Malaysia, Indonesia you can find them on the web).

So I suppose I'm saying to the OP do some careful research, wait until you are in Langkawi or Phuket and speak to people who have just arrived from the West. You will meet people organising rallies to go round SA or up the Red Sea. Make an informed judgement, by the time you get to SE Asia you should have a good idea what your boat is capable of doing and make your decision based on what you know. Only you can decide which risks you are willing to take.

Tricia
Dear Tricia,

I appreciate that you suggest that those who plan to head through areas like the Gulf of Aden need to stay abreast of current affairs and consider carefully before going. I absolutely agree.

I am very happy of course that you made it safely through in 2008, though I am bound to notice that that year was very far from a "safe" one from the point of view of pirate attacks, and the subsequent months to your own passage saw an increase of 1000 percent in successful hijackings of shipping, including leisure yachts. In the following few years, a fair number of yachts were attacked, boarded, and in some cases the crew were kidnapped, brutalised and killed.

The fact that this did not happen to you is, to be blunt, little short of good luck. You made it. Others died or were kidnapped.

Situations change, and while it is true the Somali pirates are not as much of a threat as they were the force responsible for patrolling the area has advised yachts that the area remains extremely dangerous, and that they are unable to protect small leisure craft. They account for the decline as being that large commercial vessels have become better at repelling attacks using armed escorts aboard, who have the luxury of firing from superior positions on stable, steel platforms.

This force has advised all yachts to remain out of the area.

No non gigayacht has such a luxury of tactical superiority, even with armed guards aboard, and is far more vulnerable than large commercial shipping.

But more importantly, Somali piracy is really not the biggest issue at present. The hot sectarian civil war in Yemen is. Currently a huge area of the country, something like 1/5 of its total area has fallen to the most violent and anti western faction of the Al Qaeda terrorist organisation. Recently they took control of Yemen's 5th largest city, and one of its major port cities, Al Mukalla, with a sizeable deep water commercial harbour as well as several small to medium sized boat harbours:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/04/wo...emen.html?_r=2

This happened just last month.

What do you suppose AQAP (the same organisation who launched the Charlie Hebdo massacre) is going to do with these facilities? I am quite certain it is not that they will be selling ice cream on the quayside to passing yachties!

They now hold some 200 miles of this coastline and are expanding their territorial gains rapidly, in a pattern similar to that of ISIS/DAESH in Iraq and Syria.

Markj tried to point this out above but was shouted down by ill informed candycoating of the situation, which was factually completely wrong. Aden is also under siege and all of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden coastline of Yemen belongs to rebel factions, chiefly the Houthis, with a global terrorist organisation now controlling the major and minor ports along the Eastern end of the gulf.

With regard to the Malacca straits, I am currently working in the area myself. I concur that there is not a significant threat to yachts in the area, though I would strongly counsel yachts in transit to remain on the Malaysian side of the straits, and not to coast it down the Eastern side of Sumatra.

I am however surprised at your faith in the Malaysian naval force's ability to keep the area free of pirates, as it is absolutely infested with them! Each year in the Malacca and Singapore straits there are many scores of often violent and heavily armed boardings and crew can and do get murdered during these assaults. A case of a crewman shot in the head during one of them and others severely beaten happened only a few weeks ago. The only reason that the area is relatively safe for yachts is that these guys are into big business, which takes two forms. One is the theft of thousands of tons per incident of refined fuels, in processes often involving dozens of men armed with military weapons and many sizeable fuel barges. The other is theft of major engine spares. Neither business model applies to yachts. But the area remains, for ships, one of the most dangerous in the world. The Malaysian navy haven't been very successful it seems!

Of course I wish you all the best in your onward voyages, though perhaps I may suggest to avoid the Sulu sea?
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Old 21-05-2015, 03:15   #92
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

Dear Muckle Flugga

Maybe you should re read my post?

I wasn't trying to candy coat the dangers of the Red Sea. In fact before we went there we did a fair amount of research and, since we were in Marmaris in Turkey at the time, spoke to a lot of cruisers who had recently made the journey from South to North. In Aden, we spoke with the Harbour Master who advised us that in the past month 26 ships had been hijacked. He advised us to travel at night without lights and told us to stay within 50 miles of the coast as we would have a better chance of help from the co-allition ships which were escorting convoys to and from the Gulf.

We were called up by several co-allition ships who offered us help if we needed it and asked us to report anything we saw which caused us concern. Travelling dark meant that whenever a convoy went past us the warship escorting them would turn and lead the convoy past us, each ship lighting us up with a spot light as they went past. We would turn our nav lights on as soon as we spotted a convoy, but still all 8-10 ships came past and lit us up.

I also stated the the OP should consider where he is going to re-fuel and stock up if Aden is unavailable should he choose to go the Red Sea route. I didn't advocate which way he went, he really has to weigh up the pros and cons himself and choose himself.

We've transited the Malaka Straits four times since 2011. I have heard of pirate attacks on ships, I'm not denying that it happens and I certainly didn't say it doesn't happen.

You know, if you are going to travel this way there is a certain amount of danger present and we do research carefully where we go and what dangers we are likely to meet. We talk to people who have been where we are going and get their points of view. Which with a collection of cruisers can mean you get a different opinion from each one. All I'm saying is this is my experience and so far (left the UK in 2001) it has all been pretty good.

Tricia
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Old 21-05-2015, 03:25   #93
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

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Dear Muckle Flugga

Maybe you should re read my post?

I wasn't trying to candy coat the dangers of the Red Sea.
In fact before we went there we did a fair amount of research and, since we were in Marmaris in Turkey at the time, spoke to a lot of cruisers who had recently made the journey from South to North. In Aden, we spoke with the Harbour Master who advised us that in the past month 26 ships had been hijacked. He advised us to travel at night without lights and told us to stay within 50 miles of the coast as we would have a better chance of help from the co-allition ships which were escorting convoys to and from the Gulf.

We were called up by several co-allition ships who offered us help if we needed it and asked us to report anything we saw which caused us concern. Travelling dark meant that whenever a convoy went past us the warship escorting them would turn and lead the convoy past us, each ship lighting us up with a spot light as they went past. We would turn our nav lights on as soon as we spotted a convoy, but still all 8-10 ships came past and lit us up.

I also stated the the OP should consider where he is going to re-fuel and stock up if Aden is unavailable should he choose to go the Red Sea route. I didn't advocate which way he went, he really has to weigh up the pros and cons himself and choose himself.

We've transited the Malaka Straits four times since 2011. I have heard of pirate attacks on ships, I'm not denying that it happens and I certainly didn't say it doesn't happen.

You know, if you are going to travel this way there is a certain amount of danger present and we do research carefully where we go and what dangers we are likely to meet. We talk to people who have been where we are going and get their points of view. Which with a collection of cruisers can mean you get a different opinion from each one. All I'm saying is this is my experience and so far (left the UK in 2001) it has all been pretty good.

Tricia
I never intended to say you were. Perhaps I was unclear. I was referring to an earlier poster. I thought your contribution was balanced. Thanks for the enhancement of detail regarding your transit of Aden in 2008. I am glad you made it safely through. It does not strike me that it was particularly safe, however.

The situation in Malacca/Sincapore straits is very different. Pirates in these waters have very rarely ever targeted yachts. It's just big, organised crime dealing with big ships and their cargoes and engine parts. My comment was just that the presence of Malaysian naval vessels hasn't proved particularly effective to date! I hope that you continue to enjoy your sailing.
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Old 21-05-2015, 04:39   #94
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

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Or, like, anywhere between Socotra and Aden? So?

And have you contacted the commander of these "patrol boats" to find where in this 205,000 square mile area thes "15 'additional' boats" are going to be deployed, and under what terms of engagement?

Well? I assume you have done your research. So? How exactly are they likely to be of assistance to you, in your particular transit plan?
YES I KNOW THE OWNER OF THE COMPANY

I know the captains and the vast majority of the crew and 3 former navy seals and 7 former UK special forces I work for them have been for past two yrs and I will be back out in the gulf on 5th June for my 8 week rota as a enginner based on 1 of the two supply vessels .

On my last rota back in April I was witness too 4 yachts passing up to Red Sea from gulf of Aden 2 German yachts 1 French and one solo American yacht .
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Old 21-05-2015, 06:18   #95
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

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YES I KNOW THE OWNER OF THE COMPANY

I know the captains and the vast majority of the crew and 3 former navy seals and 7 former UK special forces I work for them have been for past two yrs and I will be back out in the gulf on 5th June for my 8 week rota as a enginner based on 1 of the two supply vessels .

On my last rota back in April I was witness too 4 yachts passing up to Red Sea from gulf of Aden 2 German yachts 1 French and one solo American yacht .
Well the best of luck to them and to you. I hope the likes of this does not complicate things for you in the coming year or two:

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015...emen.html?_r=0

So you are an employee of the mercenary/security firm? Are they tasked to protect all and any of the small private yachts heading through the area? For a private security firm this would seem remarkably generous… And, as a previous poster requested, can you clarify why an additional 15 mercenary defense craft are being provided and paid for at this point if the area is now entirely secure? Who is picking up this surely pretty steep tab, and why?

With regard to the yachts, of course it is possible. The question is, is it wise, and are the risks being adequately calculated by ordinary captains of small leisure craft who do not ship a company of retired SEAL mercenaries on their slow moving craft, particularly in view of the rapidly changing situation?

With regard to your own plan, if you are in constant private and personal contact with the captains and crew of 15 high speed mercenary craft who may come to your aid at the drop of a hat, well, that is good for you. Does every captain of small craft in the area have access to such a possible escort service? If so it might be useful for you to put contact details on this thread currently being read by such as may need it. And, even if you do, would such a craft be fast enough to prevent a yacht boarding by another high speed craft with armed men of the wrong sort aboard, or are you thinking more that they will stage an assault once the undesirables are already on the yacht? You mentioned the additional 15 private merc boats in context of acknowledging EUNAVFOR's statement that, with multiple warships in the area and air cover etc, they are unable to defend small slow moving leisure craft. I am left wondering how a private security firm is going to significantly alter that fact?

Can you clarify?
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Old 21-05-2015, 07:23   #96
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

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In Aden, we spoke with the Harbour Master who advised us that in the past month 26 ships had been hijacked. He advised us to travel at night without lights and told us to stay within 50 miles of the coast as we would have a better chance of help from the co-allition ships which were escorting convoys to and from the Gulf.

...
One other thing. This advice is interesting (though to me would not have seemed particularly reassuring, it has to be said, to put it mildly!). I presume that the advice applied to remaining within 50 miles of the Yemeni coast?

Given the current situation, it would seem that this would now be extraordinarily bad advice! Especially in the Eastern part of the passage. If one could talk to the harbour master in Aden now (one wonders if there is one, at the present time!), I wonder what the advice now would be?
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Old 21-05-2015, 07:42   #97
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

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YES I KNOW THE OWNER OF THE COMPANY

I know the captains and the vast majority of the crew and 3 former navy seals and 7 former UK special forces I work for them have been for past two yrs and I will be back out in the gulf on 5th June for my 8 week rota as a enginner based on 1 of the two supply vessels .

On my last rota back in April I was witness too 4 yachts passing up to Red Sea from gulf of Aden 2 German yachts 1 French and one solo American yacht .

Since you are working with the company could you give some insight into their specific mission. Are the patrol boats escorting paying customers or are they there for general security of all vessels in the area?

Are these patrol boats boarding and inspecting all suspicious vessels in the area to deter the hijackers from working in the area or just guarding client vessels against approach by suspicious boats?

Even if there to provide security for all vessels in the area, private or commercial, that's a large area and your nearest patrol boat could easily be many hours away from a yacht in trouble. Plenty of time for a yacht to be boarded and the crew to be kidnapped.
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Old 21-05-2015, 10:46   #98
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

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So? About these boats? Still waiting for basic answers to basic questions concerning, you know, avoiding kidnap and execution and other trivial stuff like that... And, with regard to stopping, I would be fascinated to discover where you would?
I'm always shocked at how some people are so willing to unnecessarily risk their lives and the lives of others.

Except for calling for help that may or may not be there, what's a viable PLAN B or C when a faster boat full of armed criminals are approaching....

You are at their mercy plain and simple. You are unarmed, in a slower boat betting your life and that of others that you won't be seriously hurt or killed.

Why on earth would ANY sane person take that gamble? Betting the odds that this won't happen to them? Well, once that faster boat is approaching and help is NOT immediately forthcoming, that's it....game over. You have just bet and lost and the stakes were your life.

People obviously have various opinions over the risk, or lack thereof of which you've described. You've gone thru great lengths to illuminate the dangers and the UNPREDICTABLE nature of the situation in that area. Yet it appears some are still willing to throw caution to the wind. I wish them well.

To the naysayers...yes life is full of risks. There are many things I do that many consider dangerous or foolhardy. But I always manage the level of risk based on KNOWN factors and ALWAYS with a viable plan B or C. To do otherwise is just plain stupid.
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Old 21-05-2015, 10:58   #99
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

One major point that I think is getting lost in this discussion.

We are talking about cruising, fun, holiday. We aren't in the military on a mission. Not out personally trying to rescue a lost family member. Not even working and going to this region as a job assignment.

It's a vacation!!!

Why take a chance of kidnap or death when you're on a vacation? Sailing already has risks of bad weather, running aground, sinking, all the usual stuff that is part and parcel of cruising. Why add a completely unnecessary risk of dealing with terrorists and pirates, even if it's a small risk?
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Old 21-05-2015, 11:09   #100
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

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One major point that I think is getting lost in this discussion.

We are talking about cruising, fun, holiday. We aren't in the military on a mission. Not out personally trying to rescue a lost family member. Not even working and going to this region as a job assignment.

It's a vacation!!!

Why take a chance of kidnap or death when you're on a vacation? Sailing already has risks of bad weather, running aground, sinking, all the usual stuff that is part and parcel of cruising. Why add a completely unnecessary risk of dealing with terrorists and pirates, even if it's a small risk?
Bingo. And, small risk? Well… Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, the most violent and powerful and dangerous of the Al Qaeda global terror organisation's affiliates now dominates Yemen's largest province, and has under its control military bases, airports, large military weapons dumps, and, rather importantly for this thread, and for the lives of LEISURE BOATERS considering sailing past their now some 200NM of coastline, a MAJOR MARITIME PORT CITY AT THE EASTERN ENTRANCE TO THE GULF OF ADEN!

Anyone who does not think this is of major concern must be not in full control of their reason.

I mean… is anyone reading this contemplating a cultural holiday to Palmyra at the moment? No? Why not?
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Old 21-05-2015, 11:24   #101
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

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People obviously have various opinions over the risk, or lack thereof of which you've described. You've gone thru great lengths to illuminate the dangers and the UNPREDICTABLE nature of the situation in that area. Yet it appears some are still willing to throw caution to the wind. I wish them well.

To the naysayers...yes life is full of risks. There are many things I do that many consider dangerous or foolhardy. But I always manage the level of risk based on KNOWN factors and ALWAYS with a viable plan B or C. To do otherwise is just plain stupid.
Thank you for noticing. I consider this rather obviuously one would have thought, to be an extremely dangerous crisis, and treating it lightly is just plain bizarre. You are 100% right in your analysis that the risks in this situation are unknown and cannot be quantified as the current territorial, strategic, and economic gains amounting to the level of proto states of terrorist Islamic extremist organisations is unprecedented in scope, scale and ambition. To gamble your own life or that of your family on a ramble past such states is really quite … I am not even sure what to call it. The people we have seen conquer huge swathes of this area despite determined international military opposition and US supplied Saudi air strikes, and many YEARS of US drone strikes, are not pirates. They are not likely merely to hold you for ransom. Recent events have shown that if they capture you they will likely hold you in terrifying and appalling conditions, may carry out many mock executions, prior to filming your actual execution, by means which have recently included beheading with a knife, and burning alive in a cage.

The reason I have gone to such great lengths on this thread is that it is quite apparent that there are many who consider the threat in this region to have substantially declined to the point that they are deciding to take leisure trips through the area. The complete opposite is the truth, and I am painfully aware that people are typically very poor at realising and assessing the downsides of situations like this in a sufficiently vivid manner. Humans have a natural tendency to envision themselves as the ones for whom the truly dreadful does not or will not happen: that they will be the lucky ones. This likely and sadly includes many of the people who have been kidnapped and beheaded on video by the salafist compatriots of the group now in control of much of the Eastern coastline and ports of the Gulf of Aden. It probably included the staff of Charlie Hebdo. And I have little doubt it includes some of the yachties pootling along in their plastic leisure boats past thousands of miles of a hot and highly active WAR ZONE. I sincerely hope that my efforts have made some of those who would, think twice. What is the worst that can happen if they choose not to go or not to go by this route? What is the worst that can happen if they choose to do so?

Finally, I am afraid that I consider it to be fantastically selfish. This is a desperate crisis of major international implication and concern, in which real people are dying on a daily basis, currently the majority of whom are children. There are military vessels in the area trying to protect commercial ships who have NO CHOICE but to go through this area. They have asked yachties to STAY AWAY. And one of the reasons for this must be that they have enough on their plate without having to worry about the kidnap and rescue or further crisis generated by the LEISURE PLANS of some random yachtie! This is NOT about YOUR TRAVEL PLANS!
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Old 21-05-2015, 11:52   #102
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

I read that Palmyra is in the process or has fallen.
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Old 21-05-2015, 11:59   #103
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

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I read that Palmyra is in the process or has fallen.
It has. Part of my point. And an apalling tragedy that may now be. The treasure of the ancient world, home of Queen Zenobia, is now at risk of being razed to the ground as have been Nimrud, Nineveh, Hatra, and other of the greatest archaeological treasures of the world. A world which frankly has bigger fish to fry than worrying about rescuing some yachties who figured "what the heck, it'll be fine…" not thinkng either about what REALLY may befall them, OR what problems for others their entirely self oriented plans will result in. Meanwhile, as they pootle along down the coast, they an listen out for the sound of shelling and airstrikes which are killing civilians and children. Some of the areas currently undergoing this, such as the Port of Aden (using US supplied ordnance, by the way, and how do you think that will affect the welcome a western yachtie will receive among the Houthies?), are easily within yachtie earshot. I suppose it will make an interesting anecdote should they win the crap shoot!
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Old 21-05-2015, 12:15   #104
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

Just to re-enforce what Muckle Flugga is saying this week the Saudis have moved AMX-30 French made main battle tanks up to the border with Yemen to support the Saudi lead coalition to defeat Al Qaida. In addition Morocco has sent 6 fast jets to the region to support the Coalition.

Now as Skipmac says sailing is supposed to be fun. Can't think being in the middle of a small war would be anything of the sort.

Bulawayo may live in the region, but he is not the one that is going to have to get you out of there when it all goes pear shape. In fact there may not be anyone around to help someone in trouble.

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Old 21-05-2015, 14:23   #105
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Re: Piracy In Gulf of Aden

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Just to re-enforce what Muckle Flugga is saying this week the Saudis have moved AMX-30 French made main battle tanks up to the border with Yemen to support the Saudi lead coalition to defeat Al Qaida. In addition Morocco has sent 6 fast jets to the region to support the Coalition.

Now as Skipmac says sailing is supposed to be fun. Can't think being in the middle of a small war would be anything of the sort.

Bulawayo may live in the region, but he is not the one that is going to have to get you out of there when it all goes pear shape. In fact there may not be anyone around to help someone in trouble.

Pete
Pete, I read that MF had agreed not to post further (as did I) but as I am now mentioned by yourself I am responding. I have read some pretty severe postings; a total intolerance of other people's opinions, derogatory comments and so opinionated as to defy belief. Bullying, insulting and demeaning others is an assured way to stop many contributing. Anyone can glean information from the media but using it appropriately whilst not attempting to deride others who have opposed opinions is a responsibility. If this is their normal behaviour .............
Making posts to outdated links and connections to other horrors is also not helpful. I have not read of any sailor being burned alive in a cage. If a new event should occur, and the situation changes, then outraged accusations of backpeddling follow.
Typically, Syria is an awful long way from the Gulf of Aden; Palmyra is a wonderful place and we found the locals to be very friendly and decent people and it is heart breaking if the place is damaged. Not withstanding it is far removed from Yemen.
I have also seen a posting citing the UK Govt. website about avoiding the routing. Please check out their comments on many countries that are referenced as 'no go' that are actually routine tourist destinations. The UK Government protects itself very well in this regard. This is not to say the information is incorrect but you'll find they say similar about many countries. I also find it pretty ironic when one poster states he travelled this very route during a period of very active pirate activity - how was that decision justified? what input did the crew have in that decision? Don't do as I do, but do as I say. Some people display a particular arrogance when they are actually not even located in the region and rely on media coverage for their expertise and then extend the Yemini war into the actual GoA itself. When another posting postulated that the land war was not necessarily affecting the GoA they were immediately subjected to an onslaught for having the audacity to voice their own opinion. Dont do as I do, do as I say.
Right now the weather conditions are also not favourable for a GoA transit to the Red Sea - its experiencing predominantly SW winds, so small boat traffic is likely reduced presently. We have seen a small number of boats heading northwards to the Suez and also a few headed south.
Sadly, the world is going through a period of significant disturbance, in certain regions - how we react as sailors is our own responsibility. I have also read a posting with links to further information that identifies avoiding northern Oman. Why? What is the justification? The area is patrolled very robustly by the Omani Navy and airforce and anyone familiar with the area shall know of the British military involvement with the Omani's. I would hazard there is concern about potential Iranian activity.
There is no point continuing on this subject when one individual is determined to dominate and is attempting to bully all and sundry who express a different opinion. If people are able to access this forum then they can also access information to make their own decisions. People shall continue to make their own choices, based on their own experience and especially that of people with up-to-date information.
Don't forget there are most likely small boats in transit as we write. The situation in Yemen is appalling - as it is in Iraq and Syria etc.
To MF my message is: you and I shall not agree on this subject; history shall provide the answer as to whether small boats shall continue to transit the GoA. Do lets try and behave in a civilised manner. I do not propose to respond to further provacative postings.
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