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Old 15-10-2008, 14:56   #61
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I read somewhere that the captain of a ship is a de-facto peace officer with arrest powers. Is this truly the case?
Yes. That is until you come back on shore. Even in the days of old the captains took authority at sea but often later back in port they got in trouble depending on how much money they made, who they hung, killed, or caused injury. You don't become exempt under the law or immune from prosecution because you are a captain at sea. Civil liability has no real boundaries though criminal activities could be muddy as far as who has the right to conduct the trial.

All that said you would do what you thought was in the best interests of the crew because you are the captain and are presumed to know what was best and you would be negligent if you did not. Presumption of ability carries greater risk than presumption of being right. It cuts both ways since if you are presumed to be correct then it also true that you can be held to a higher standard of behavior just because you should have known better. The "you should have known better because you were the captain" part is more the problem you face. It's what can land you in jail.

A crew member that becomes hysterical is a dangerous thing. How you dealt with the situation would be subjected to scrutiny. Authority carries responsibility. Don't sail with fools, nut, or the impaired.
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Old 15-10-2008, 19:34   #62
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Don't sail with fools, nut, or the impaired.
But we are married.............[jk].

What if they want to leave and you let them get on the raft and you are the only one to survive?

Damned if you do and damned if you don't, I suspect.
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Old 15-10-2008, 20:51   #63
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Damned if you do and damned if you don't, I suspect.
Sums it up pretty well. Not all marriages belong at sea. Going to sea won't make you a better person or something you just are not. You pretty much cart along all your problems no matter what the scenery is. Running head long into a confrontation may resolve issues but that is not an issue of who the captain is.
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Old 16-10-2008, 08:39   #64
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Just more proof that you should stay with the boat. I myself would be scared to death to leave a perfectly functioning boat. To jump in the water, and have a guy on a cable pull me to safety. I was already in saftey's arms. FEAR is an ugly beast!
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Old 16-10-2008, 09:15   #65
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If the rescue folks would not take anyone unless all went, we would all have been staying. What happened between captain and crew after the witnesses left the area would be interesting, at least for the captain. Hope them button thingies are not expensive, cause that one would be going overboard. Might lose friends,( that happened anyway), but I would have been the captain until we reached port or they decided to swim for it. Simply no contest. My boat or warm fuzzies from a chicken chump! Boat wins in a land slide!
Of course, I have no resources to replace a boat like that if I had one, so I would be staying at all costs. Someone with such resources might choose differently! The loss would not be life changing to them.
If the mutineer was my wife, then I would be the one swimming for land! Sweet woman, but when crossed, she is just plain mean! Course, she has stayed with me thru everything for a lot of years, so there must be something good to say for a hard headed woman!
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Old 16-10-2008, 18:41   #66
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Apparently the Air Apparent was discovered adrift 8 months later with mast still upright and a torn sail hanging overboard by the French Navy about 210nm north of it's last known position. The insurance company had already paid out and now it's up to them to decide on a salvage or a sinking. Because it's in waters off Caledonia, the Insurance Company has to work with the govt there to resolve it. Interesting story.
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Old 17-10-2008, 00:00   #67
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Shes by Norfolk Island not as far north as New Cal or not yet at least.

She is there for the taking. The Insurance Company has said it's not worth their effort to go get her.
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Old 17-10-2008, 05:48   #68
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Shes by Norfolk Island not as far north as New Cal or not yet at least.

She is there for the taking. The Insurance Company has said it's not worth their effort to go get her.
Well I guess it's all a matter of where you get your information from. I would redo my search for you for the article I found with news as of Oct 15 but I'm not particularly that interested.
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Old 24-11-2008, 16:08   #69
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Mutiny is a conspiracy among members of a group of similarly-situated individuals (typically the crew of any ship, even if they are civilians) to openly oppose, change or overthrow an existing authority.
Mutiny particularly means open rebellion against a ship’s captain. This occurred, for example, during Magellan's journey, resulting in the killing of one mutineer, the execution of another and the marooning of two others, and on Henry Hudson's Discovery, resulting in Hudson and others being set adrift in a boat.
The captain of a vessel is responsible for the safety of his crew, passengers, cargo and the environment. This certainly means preserving the vessel if at all possible. A Licensed Master on a US flagged vessel can imprison/restrain crew or passengers if it's deemed necessary for the vessels safety, he can also subject crew members to up to 3 days bread and water as punishment for serious violations (negligence, sleeping on watch), after which 1 full meal must be served.

In the original newspaper account the captain said he elected to leave because he felt unsafe being alone on this voyage. He didn't feel unsafe on the vessel, and he wasn't forced to leave.
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Old 25-05-2009, 02:36   #70
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Air Apparent update. Yacht reaches Australia

Abandoned NZ &squo;ghost yacht&squo; reaches Australia | Herald Sun

The little boat that could.

Craig
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Old 25-05-2009, 03:35   #71
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Interesting wasn't it. That's the 3rd boat abandoned by it's crew that has turned up still floating in about as many weeks down this end of the world.

About time more people were reminded 'you step UP into a liferaft, not down'. Or 'the boat leaves you, not the other way around'.

I think it's getting way too easy for people to be rescued.
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Old 29-05-2009, 07:37   #72
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WAY TOO EASY......IMHO........i2f
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Old 31-05-2009, 22:08   #73
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Never, ever leave the vessel. I get off, when the foot that is on top of the mast gets wet as the vessel is going under. There have been several cases in Alaska, where people had abandoned ship, and the vessel was found later in good enough condition to still be afloat, and the people who abandoned her were found dead from hypothermia in a life raft with survival suits on, or they were never heard from again.
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Old 06-06-2009, 19:00   #74
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Thought I'd weigh in with a crew perspective. I crewed offshore all through my twenties and the one thing I always followed was :the captain has final say period. The key is picking a good boat with a good captain, but if I made a mistake and picked a bad captain- what he said still goes. It made for some miserable sailing at times ( not reefing when we should etc), but lack of leadership is more dangerous than lack of experience or even some bad judgment. Being offshore can be disorienting and the last thing I want is a mob rule.
I did have a psycho captain once but was able to talk him into turning around and heading back to port with out "losing face".
Once, I was in a bad blow (80 knots) and I instictively got the life raft out onto the deck. I say instictively because its called a "life Raft" and in my inexperience I took it as such. Now, more experienced and a captain, I know what a stupid move that was, if the boat couldn't take that bad storm how could a blow-up raft take it. That is why crew are crew and the captain has final say period.
Hope that made sense.
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Old 07-06-2009, 01:16   #75
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Well Said Erika.
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