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Old 30-01-2010, 09:09   #421
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wind vane again

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Originally Posted by John A View Post
Reduntancy.
As a singlehandler, I had both types of aids to steering.
I was thinking of Abbys' boat. Though I notice she does have 2 hydraulic autopilots. Maybe wind wouldn´t work on a boat like hers, would certainly look out of place. I singlehand as well, though the st2000 electric autopilot keeps breaking down. Last time was a near lightning strike off Guyana, the aries windvane doesn´t mind a bit though.
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Old 30-01-2010, 13:38   #422
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I came across this article today in the Brisbane Courier Mail:

Solo sailor Jessica Watson battles dyslexia | The Courier-Mail

Its always an inspiration when the human spirit overcomes life's obstacles and prevails.

Good on you Jessica!.
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Old 30-01-2010, 16:13   #423
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Originally Posted by neelie View Post
I came across this article today in the Brisbane Courier Mail:

Solo sailor Jessica Watson battles dyslexia | The Courier-Mail

Its always an inspiration when the human spirit overcomes life's obstacles and prevails.

Good on you Jessica!.
Well said neelie! She is a true inspiration.
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Old 31-01-2010, 09:32   #424
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Neelie,

Jesse Watson is one of a kind. A true inspiration.
Here is a video link that found buried in her blog from last year before she even had a boat. Is is of her arrival in NZ after crossing the Tasman on a mock solo.
Teen skippers the high seas | News Video

Richard W

ps In the other post, sorry for saying Cape Horn, I meant Cape of Good Hope, originally named "Cape of Storms". I agree that they will keep her away, after doing research on the area. I have been doing research into rogue waves, solitons, and
"breathers" Here is a you tube showing a Falaco Soliton



Cartan's Corner : Falaco Solitons Falaco Solitons explaination
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Old 31-01-2010, 20:50   #425
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Wow Richard that is very interesting! I have seen some pretty wild stuff offshore. Stuff that I can't fully describe or even understand what the heck the water and waves were trying to do. We see a great example of the many mysteries of marine physics in a nice calm swimming pool video, imagine what crazy things go on offshore with all the variations!
Godspeed Pink Lady!
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Old 31-01-2010, 21:08   #426
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Neelie,
ps In the other post, sorry for saying Cape Horn, I meant Cape of Good Hope, originally named "Cape of Storms". I agree that they will keep her away, after doing research on the area. I have been doing research into rogue waves, solitons, and "breathers" Here is a you tube showing a Falaco Soliton
Thanks for that, I had never heard of a soliton before.

Rogue Waves | Ocean | DISCOVER Magazine

Another good read. Its enough to put one right off the Southern Ocean!
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Old 05-02-2010, 00:13   #427
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This thread has been created to discuss the sailing aspects of Jessica's journey. There is nothing more to be said about whether she should or should not be out there. The fact is that she is out there.

She is a fellow sailor on a very exciting and challenging journey. As a community of cruisers and sailors we now owe her our community support.

Posts not related to her progress update and relating to her journey will be removed.

Thanks for your community support.
There's a question which I have asked Jesse's support crew but as yet have had no answer.

The rules regarding a RTW requires the sailor to pass two opposite meridians, although the rules do not decide on Lat or Long.

Another solo sailor recently asserted a requirement to pass through the equator twice.

I presume that such is the easiest way of passing through a Meridian twice.

But so far as I can see, Jesse is pointing toward home, having passed the equator once.

So far as I can see there is no suggestion of having to pass through a Prime Meridian, so since she has sailed through 151Degrees, 18' West, can one presume she can simply nip out to sea a bit, prior to turning into Sydney Harbour, having crossing the antipode of the Long Meridian mentioned above?

Or does one have to cross a Meridian, and its antipode at an antipodean Long/Lat?

The point the rule-makes make is, one could simply walk around the North Pole, while hanging onto the pole, and complete a circumnavigation of the planet.

Comments on this are very welcome.
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Old 05-02-2010, 00:25   #428
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But so far as I can see, Jesse is pointing toward home, having passed the equator once.
Jess has crossed the equator twice: once on the way north, once on the way south.

Along with crossing every line of longitude, and completing a distance at least equal to the mean circumference of the Earth (21,600nm), that's usually enough to satisfy most people's idea of a circumnavigation.
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Old 05-02-2010, 01:50   #429
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Jess has crossed the equator twice: once on the way north, once on the way south.

Along with crossing every line of longitude, and completing a distance at least equal to the mean circumference of the Earth (21,600nm), that's usually enough to satisfy most people's idea of a circumnavigation.
I understand what you're saying, but the rules require the sailor to pass through the antipodean (the opposite) Meridian. Going over the equator then coming back is not passing the equator's antipodean position.
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Old 05-02-2010, 03:16   #430
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I understand what you're saying, but the rules require the sailor to pass through the antipodean (the opposite) Meridian. Going over the equator then coming back is not passing the equator's antipodean position.
I'm not sure what you mean by "antipodean Meridian". Do you mean "antipodean point"?

In any case, the WSSRC "rules" for circumnavigation do not require passing over two antipodean points. They are roughly as I have described above, and exactly as set out on this link (rule 26.1.a) :

The Courses Offshore

Of course Jess's "rules" are self-determined, since the WSSRC has stopped recognising "youngest" records.
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Old 05-02-2010, 03:41   #431
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Dpex : Google is your friend, see below for rules of solo RTW:

Solo Circumnavigation Rules - Stopping & Non-Stop | Youngest Solo Circumnavigators

also see the Vendee Globe (advertised as a RTW race) route:

Vendée Globe

It's shape loosely approximates that of this circumnavigation, except its probably 2500 miles longer due to the Lat difference between Sydney and Les Sables d'Olonne.
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Old 05-02-2010, 05:11   #432
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What rules? There are no rules for underage RTW. She is operating on her own as underage RTW is not recognized by any major sailing record organization.
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Old 05-02-2010, 06:08   #433
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I understand what you're saying, but the rules require the sailor to pass through the antipodean (the opposite) Meridian. Going over the equator then coming back is not passing the equator's antipodean position.
The equator is not a meridean. A meridian is a line of longitude.

Yacht racing rules define a world circumnavigation to be a passage of at least 21,600 nautical miles in length, which crosses the equator, crosses every meridian, and finishes in the same port as it starts.

Since Sydney is located at approximately 151 degrees East (x 34 S), a circumnavigator (starting from Sydney) would have to pass 151 deg. twice, and the Prime (and EVERY other) Meridian and the Equator at least once.

As neelie suggests, when you don't know, Google is your friend.
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Old 05-02-2010, 06:14   #434
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpex View Post
The rules regarding a RTW requires the sailor to pass two opposite meridians, although the rules do not decide on Lat or Long.

Another solo sailor recently asserted a requirement to pass through the equator twice.

I presume that such is the easiest way of passing through a Meridian twice.

So far as I can see there is no suggestion of having to pass through a Prime Meridian, so since she has sailed through 151Degrees, 18' West, can one presume she can simply nip out to sea a bit, prior to turning into Sydney Harbour, having crossing the antipode of the Long Meridian mentioned above?

Or does one have to cross a Meridian, and its antipode at an antipodean Long/Lat?
Meridians are only lines of longitude. There is only one Prime Meridian (0°E/W).
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Old 05-02-2010, 06:36   #435
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Ooops...huge arithmetic error on my part -

If only accounting Latitude differences then JW's route is approximately 5640 nm shorter than Vende Globe route. i.e. 47 N to equator and back = 94 X 60 = 5640nm.

In the end, who cares?... either way you slice it, its still a bloody impressive achievement by anyone's standards. She has way, way more guts and determination than I'll ever have.
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