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Old 11-04-2008, 16:48   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie View Post
More info:
Two of the sailors were injured. This may have contributed to the Epirb decision.
Gale warnings (35+knots) were posted...and reported.
170 miles out put them firmly in the Stream.

Bad decision to leave. Not enough info to be definitive on anything else but it was all a result of the first bad decision.
Thanks for the info, camaraderie. Does anyone have an update on this?

The fact that two sailors were injured seems to indicate that the rig DID come down. I would consider two injured, in that case, a plausible scenario.

Otherwise, one can sail nicely in 40 knot winds, if need be, and even with two injured crew, sail back to port. Itís sort of hard to figure out this rescue without more input.

If anyone has any information, please contribute.

Thanks.
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Old 11-04-2008, 17:04   #17
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I don't think this is as easy as you make it sound. I live on the Gulf Stream. A north wind against the Stream results in very steep waves with a short wave period. You would have to see it to understand. Even 100,000 ton cruise ships steer clear here in florida, as it challenges their stabilizers.

The closest thing I can compare it with when I lived up north is the Block Island to LI sound tranistion where you have wind against tide in the area called "the Race". Having said that, the Gulf stream is much worse, as it's unending, in a 40 knot north wind.
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Old 11-04-2008, 17:30   #18
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What you describe is what we call a “Kreuzsee” or “Cross Sea”, when wind and current collide. Those are really nasty. We get them over here as well. Case in point is the reach between the Spanish mainland and Mallorca – strong current going north from Africa, winds from the north. It can get nasty.

Do you have any information what happened on that boat? Are there any links?
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Old 11-04-2008, 20:47   #19
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Michael...no further reports or interviews since the 9th I'm afraid. I intend to keep checking & will post if I see something.

Would also make the point that 15ft. significant wave height ALSO means that a 30 ft. wave will occur about once every two hours...falling off one of those in the Gulfstream can do a LOT of damage!
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Old 12-04-2008, 06:17   #20
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The fact that the Gulf Stream is one of the two most trecherous areas of water on the planet is often not respected or understood by those that are not intimately familier with it. The other being off the coast of east Africa. When I grew up in NJ, it was so far off shore that we never even thought about it as coastal sailors, but those of us in the tuna tournements held there understood it full well. In Miami, where a large portion of the boating public is not from the U.S. originally, recreational boats are constantly in trouble out there in a north wind. It's all about a lack of respect and understanding for the sea and too much machismo. IN reflexion on what you say about German sailors plying the North Sea, I would guess that the decision to stay in port was vetoed due to the North Sea experience without a good understanding about how vicious the Gulf Stream really is. There's a reason why experienced crossers of the stream congregate in No Name Harbor for weeks on Key Biscayne sometimes waiting for an opportunity to cross, while others just go without even checking......
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Old 12-04-2008, 15:00   #21
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Comaradie - thanks nonetheless for checking. Iíll keep an eye out for anything that appears in the German sailing periodicals. Losing a yacht is something which usually gets covered.

I must admit Iíve never heard of the Gulf Stream phenomenon you describe, especially as related to sailing. Just never came up, I guess. Enough stuff over here in the Mediterranean to keep us occupied as it is.

I suppose it shows all the more how important it is to inform oneself regarding the regions one will be sailing in. Falling off a 30 ft wave doesnít sound like anything Iíd want to try out. I think this all has to do with the respect and understanding, which waterworldly refers too.

Your observation, waterworldly, regarding the North Sea experience and the veto would appear to be spot on.

I just did a search using German key words and couldnít find anything on the rescue over here either.
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Old 13-04-2008, 10:52   #22
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If everone did the right thing than there would be no one to train on when they really will be needed.
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Old 16-05-2008, 19:54   #23
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Btrayfors and RickM505 have nailed it.....The Gulf Stream is no place to be in a NE wind of 30+ knots.....

That Stream is a River that runs north at a 5k clip in places....add to that the eddys that form in circular patterns around it...cold water and warm water eddies running opposite of each other....it can confuse the hell out of a sea. I'm sure they took a pounding. If they weren't watching their navigation, they could have even been sailing backwards.....if two sailors were injured ..it left 3 to hand steer round the clock...there's no staying dry..exhaustion sets in.....sad to lose a vessel....but no one has to visit next of kin....so good outcome....Thanks to the coast guard..
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