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Old 13-06-2019, 16:47   #1
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Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

Boat looks like it is in awfully good shape, at least above the waterline.

Quote:
The New Zealand Defence Force has located a missing Norwegian sailor whose boat broke down on the way to Tahiti from New Zealand.

The sailor sent a distress signal after his vessel suffered a mechanical failure more than half way into this journey, about 2800 kilometres east-northeast of New Zealand on Tuesday.

The Air Force sent up an P-3K2 Orion aircraft and located the man, who was standing on the stern of his vessel waving his red jacket to highlight his location.
......

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/113...-way-to-tahiti


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Old 13-06-2019, 17:15   #2
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

Rudder failure maybe? Or steering system?
They dont say what the "mechanical failure" is, but it looked to be sailing from the Orion photos.
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Old 13-06-2019, 17:24   #3
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

Who knows, maybe a Medical condition?
People break too
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Old 13-06-2019, 17:30   #4
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

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Who knows, maybe a Medical condition?
People break too
Too true, people break more than boats, understandably so I reckon.
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Old 13-06-2019, 17:54   #5
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

As things like sailing become easier to get involved in you are bound to find a greater variety of people trying them and as a result many different versions of "to much" or "couldn't/can't".

I also have been involved in relatable situations were the owner had insurance and so was not willing to work any harder because he knew it would not be a huge loss to him.

The article specifically cited "mechanical failure" though.



***The comments above are simply anecdotal. The reasons for the decisions made in this situation are unknown and ultimately always lie with the skipper. I do not want to put down this man or any other who has been forced by circumstance to abandon their vessel, I am only intending to respond to the comments made.
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Old 13-06-2019, 18:14   #6
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

Duplicate thread Yacht 'Albatross' abandoned.
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Old 13-06-2019, 22:07   #7
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

That is usually a boisterous sail, coming and going, when we did it anyways.
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Old 14-06-2019, 08:36   #8
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

Ahh, the P3 Orion, great aircraft that served many years in the U.S. Navy and is still working hard for other countries. Good to see it aided in this sailors rescue.
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Old 14-06-2019, 12:17   #9
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

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Originally Posted by Compass790 View Post
Too true, people break more than boats, understandably so I reckon.
When you are actually out there, its entirely different than you can imagine. Your whole world rolling without end. Every task is harder than imagined...going to the head, getting a drink of water, even sleeping. After a couple weeks the strain can be overwhelming as the brain starts to suffer from lack of food, liquid, sleep. Captain and crew can get grumpy, even furious for little or no reason at all. And with hundreds or thousands of miles left to go, the mind begins to stray. For someone not mentally prepared it can be a living hell. And with no end in sight, the desire to just go home can become overwhelming.

When I crossed the Atlantic, the skipper/owner experienced so much stress that literally his eyes began to bleed. We called an eye specialist on the sat phone who said to eliminate the cause of his stress...LOL. We had 3 reefs in the main for a week solid...and I wish there had been a 4th reef. The waves were mountainous. The boat rolled from gunnel to gunnel and there was a cacophony of noise from below as every single item aboard knocked about in its cabinet. The teak decks leaked and everything was soaked in salt water. Once the fresh food was gone, we ate little more than baked potatoes and black beans. The rest of the crew did their best to stay drunk all day, and I stood watch alone all night, every night. Words cannot describe the emotions and thoughts that go through your head on such a trip.

We sit here at our computers and phones and read about ocean passages and tropical anchorages. But the reality of a long passage can be quite different than the romantic images often portrayed. It does not end until you finish. Weeks at sea, going slow.

I would love to hear the story from the rescued skipper.
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Old 14-06-2019, 12:46   #10
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

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Originally Posted by hamburking View Post
When you are actually out there, its entirely different than you can imagine. Your whole world rolling without end. Every task is harder than imagined...going to the head, getting a drink of water, even sleeping. After a couple weeks the strain can be overwhelming as the brain starts to suffer from lack of food, liquid, sleep. Captain and crew can get grumpy, even furious for little or no reason at all. And with hundreds or thousands of miles left to go, the mind begins to stray. For someone not mentally prepared it can be a living hell. And with no end in sight, the desire to just go home can become overwhelming.

When I crossed the Atlantic, the skipper/owner experienced so much stress that literally his eyes began to bleed. We called an eye specialist on the sat phone who said to eliminate the cause of his stress...LOL. We had 3 reefs in the main for a week solid...and I wish there had been a 4th reef. The waves were mountainous. The boat rolled from gunnel to gunnel and there was a cacophony of noise from below as every single item aboard knocked about in its cabinet. The teak decks leaked and everything was soaked in salt water. Once the fresh food was gone, we ate little more than baked potatoes and black beans. The rest of the crew did their best to stay drunk all day, and I stood watch alone all night, every night. Words cannot describe the emotions and thoughts that go through your head on such a trip.

We sit here at our computers and phones and read about ocean passages and tropical anchorages. But the reality of a long passage can be quite different than the romantic images often portrayed. It does not end until you finish. Weeks at sea, going slow.

I would love to hear the story from the rescued skipper.
Agree completely. While I did not do the Atlantic crossing yet, I did do a bunch of 7-10 days offshore non stop. The factors which made each trip not just palatable but enjoyable in any weather or conditions was (in that order) 1. well found boat, 2. highly competent skipper/owner and 3. reasonably competent and friendly crew.

I can't even imagine lacking any one of these factors never mind all three in the middle of nowhere and 1,000s miles from land.
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Old 14-06-2019, 17:43   #11
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

Quote:
Originally Posted by hamburking View Post
When you are actually out there, its entirely different than you can imagine. Your whole world rolling without end. Every task is harder than imagined...going to the head, getting a drink of water, even sleeping. After a couple weeks the strain can be overwhelming as the brain starts to suffer from lack of food, liquid, sleep. Captain and crew can get grumpy, even furious for little or no reason at all. And with hundreds or thousands of miles left to go, the mind begins to stray. For someone not mentally prepared it can be a living hell. And with no end in sight, the desire to just go home can become overwhelming.

When I crossed the Atlantic, the skipper/owner experienced so much stress that literally his eyes began to bleed. We called an eye specialist on the sat phone who said to eliminate the cause of his stress...LOL. We had 3 reefs in the main for a week solid...and I wish there had been a 4th reef. The waves were mountainous. The boat rolled from gunnel to gunnel and there was a cacophony of noise from below as every single item aboard knocked about in its cabinet. The teak decks leaked and everything was soaked in salt water. Once the fresh food was gone, we ate little more than baked potatoes and black beans. The rest of the crew did their best to stay drunk all day, and I stood watch alone all night, every night. Words cannot describe the emotions and thoughts that go through your head on such a trip.

We sit here at our computers and phones and read about ocean passages and tropical anchorages. But the reality of a long passage can be quite different than the romantic images often portrayed. It does not end until you finish. Weeks at sea, going slow.

I would love to hear the story from the rescued skipper.
Well said,I agree.Ocean crossing ,particularly short handed is totally different from coastal cruising. Sleep deprivation mixed with continous movement and responsibility a 1,000nm from anywhere is something that needs to be experienced to be appreciated.

Being the skipper is very different from being crew, ive done both, the buck stops with the skipper, thus he carrys the load.

Its always a great day when you make it to port.
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Old 14-06-2019, 20:15   #12
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

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Well said,I agree.Ocean crossing ,particularly short handed is totally different from coastal cruising. Sleep deprivation mixed with continous movement and responsibility a 1,000nm from anywhere is something that needs to be experienced to be appreciated.

Being the skipper is very different from being crew, ive done both, the buck stops with the skipper, thus he carrys the load.

Its always a great day when you make it to port.
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Old 14-06-2019, 20:40   #13
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

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...a living hell... And with no end in sight, the desire to just go home can become overwhelming It does not end until you finish. Weeks at sea, going slow.
Get on a faster boat.
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Old 14-06-2019, 22:33   #14
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

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Get on a faster boat.
Fly if in a hurry or inpatient as the difference between weeks and a week more is only inside your head.
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Old 15-06-2019, 00:43   #15
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Re: Bavarua 42 abandoned enroute NZ to Tahiti

It doesn't look like it has a windvane, so single handing that journey is pretty optimistic. I wouldn't try it without a vane and plenty of spares,as well as spares for the autopilot and an emergency rudder.

If his autopilot died and he doesn't have the experience to set up his storm jib for self steering then he might well have called it quits.
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