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Old 16-01-2014, 14:24   #166
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re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

Another news tidbit. No new news except this pic of Sail editor Charles Doane. He's on the right.
Noted Sailing Writer Rescued off Virginia | NewEnglandBoating.com
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Old 16-01-2014, 14:32   #167
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pirate re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern Star View Post
Thanks Boatman, love you too!!!! I thought that elsewhere on this site you were extolling the virtues of a 'bricksh*t house of the seas' called the Lagoon 380?

They were looking for something newer than a 40yr old boat...

Of course, no one should expect you're opinions to be consistent....

Heaven Forbid....

Afterall, there is no fun in that!

Exactly.. its cold, wet and I'm bored..

Cheers!

Brad
Have a Grand Year...
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Old 16-01-2014, 15:56   #168
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re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

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Originally Posted by boatman61 View Post
[FONT=Comic Sans MS][SIZE=3]Cold, wet bored???
Boatie, get your bum back to Oz... warm, mostly dry, and good sailing. Good enough that we had Geoff and Kate out for a spin yesterday... your company would have made if perfect!

Cheers,

Jim
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Old 16-01-2014, 16:12   #169
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re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

Just so you know, their out there keeping score
Here is the standings.

Thread Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry | Cruising News & Events - Cruisers & Sailing Forums | Omgili
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Old 16-01-2014, 16:21   #170
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pirate re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

ROFLMAO... and folks were worried about the NSA...
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Old 16-01-2014, 16:42   #171
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re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

By Charles McMahon
cmcmahon@seacoastonline.com
January 16, 2014 2:00 AM

PORTSMOUTH — South End resident Charlie Doane returned home Wednesday following a days-long ordeal at sea earlier this week, in which he and three others were rescued from a disabled sailboat floating adrift hundreds of miles off the coast of Virginia.

The rescue, which occurred roughly 300 miles east of Cape Henry, Va., was captured on video by members of the U.S. Coast Guard on board a Jayhawk helicopter.

Doane, an editor for Sail magazine and self-described "experienced sailor," appeared calm and collected inside his Pleasant Street home Wednesday afternoon while retelling his experience at sea.

The journey began Jan. 8, when Doane said he boarded a 42-foot sailboat named "Be Good Too" for a delivery trip from New York to the U.S. Virgin Islands. Also on board the vessel were boat owners Gunther and Doris Rodatz, as well as another experienced sailor, Hank Schmidt, who Doane said was hired by the owners to skipper the boat to the Caribbean.

The first two days of the journey were easy sailing, Doane said. Things started taking a turn for the worse on Friday, when Doane said the wind began to increase in strength and the seas began to build.
Up to this point in the journey, Doane said he and the rest of the crew had experienced only a few minor issues while sailing.

But all of that changed on Saturday, when Doane said the sailboat was struck by a massive wave.
"It was one big hit right across the front of the boat," he said. "It was a huge hit."
The boat was then almost simultaneously struck by another wave, Doane recalled.
With obvious damage to the boat's steering capabilities, as well as a diminished propulsion system, Doane said a decision was made to lay idle and "let the waves do with you what they will."
"This was the one time I was nervous," he said.

In the days to follow, Doane said he and the others on board attempted to fix some of the damage caused by the weather. Not only were they forced to try to pump water from inside the boat, but Doane said they also worked to repair the ship's damaged steering mechanics.
"The rudder had somehow been bent," he said. "It was useless."
So, after doing everything they could to repair the boat and continue on their journey south, Doane said a decision was made collectively to abandon the boat and seek rescue.

"We opened a bottle of good wine and had a discussion on what we should do," he said.
The next day, Doane said the vessel was reported in distress and the Coast Guard began to devise a rescue plan for the crew.

Coast Guard officials were initially going to respond to the disabled boat with a Coast Guard cutter, however they determined that was not feasible due to the distance offshore.

Officials then contacted U.S. Fleet Forces personnel, requesting a Navy vessel to assist the Coast Guard in their response. The USS Ross, a 505-foot guided missile destroyer, diverted from its course to provide a refueling platform for a Coast Guard helicopter on its way to conduct the rescue mission.

Matthew Brooks, a Coast Guard 5th District Command Center command duty officer, said in a prepared statement that officials spoke with the crew aboard the boat Monday and agreed that they would depart the vessel Monday night. However, that proved challenging, according to Brooks.

"We did not want to conduct a transfer at night due to the risk of the mission and the fact that the crew was not in immediate distress," he said.
On Tuesday, Coast Guard officials dispatched crews aboard a Jayhawk helicopter and an HC-130 Hercules aircraft from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C., at approximately 6:20 a.m. to assist.

The Jayhawk crew landed on the USS Ross to refuel at approximately 7:30 a.m. and then proceeded to the location of the "Be Good Too."

The Jayhawk crew reportedly rescued Doane and the three others aboard the vessel by hoisting them into the helicopter.

Doane said he was lifted into the helicopter first, followed by the rest of the crew.
"The Coast Guard guys were great," he said.

Looking back at the ordeal Wednesday, Doane said he was never really in fear for his life.
"We never felt in imminent danger," he said.

Despite never having needed to be rescued before, Doane said the situation was much less harrowing than it would appear.

Sadly, Doane said the abandoned boat was left to drift unmanned at sea. The vessel reportedly cost in the range of $500,000, he said.

"They had a lot invested in that boat," Doane said of the owners. "It will probably end up sinking."

Coast Guard rescues Portsmouth man (with video) | SeacoastOnline.com
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Old 16-01-2014, 17:08   #172
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cotemar View Post
By Charles McMahon
cmcmahon@seacoastonline.com
January 16, 2014 2:00 AM

PORTSMOUTH — South End resident Charlie Doane returned home Wednesday following a days-long ordeal at sea earlier this week, in which he and three others were rescued from a disabled sailboat floating adrift hundreds of miles off the coast of Virginia.

The rescue, which occurred roughly 300 miles east of Cape Henry, Va., was captured on video by members of the U.S. Coast Guard on board a Jayhawk helicopter.

Doane, an editor for Sail magazine and self-described "experienced sailor," appeared calm and collected inside his Pleasant Street home Wednesday afternoon while retelling his experience at sea.

The journey began Jan. 8, when Doane said he boarded a 42-foot sailboat named "Be Good Too" for a delivery trip from New York to the U.S. Virgin Islands. Also on board the vessel were boat owners Gunther and Doris Rodatz, as well as another experienced sailor, Hank Schmidt, who Doane said was hired by the owners to skipper the boat to the Caribbean.

The first two days of the journey were easy sailing, Doane said. Things started taking a turn for the worse on Friday, when Doane said the wind began to increase in strength and the seas began to build.
Up to this point in the journey, Doane said he and the rest of the crew had experienced only a few minor issues while sailing.

But all of that changed on Saturday, when Doane said the sailboat was struck by a massive wave.
"It was one big hit right across the front of the boat," he said. "It was a huge hit."
The boat was then almost simultaneously struck by another wave, Doane recalled.
With obvious damage to the boat's steering capabilities, as well as a diminished propulsion system, Doane said a decision was made to lay idle and "let the waves do with you what they will."
"This was the one time I was nervous," he said.

In the days to follow, Doane said he and the others on board attempted to fix some of the damage caused by the weather. Not only were they forced to try to pump water from inside the boat, but Doane said they also worked to repair the ship's damaged steering mechanics.
"The rudder had somehow been bent," he said. "It was useless."
So, after doing everything they could to repair the boat and continue on their journey south, Doane said a decision was made collectively to abandon the boat and seek rescue.

"We opened a bottle of good wine and had a discussion on what we should do," he said.
The next day, Doane said the vessel was reported in distress and the Coast Guard began to devise a rescue plan for the crew.

Coast Guard officials were initially going to respond to the disabled boat with a Coast Guard cutter, however they determined that was not feasible due to the distance offshore.

Officials then contacted U.S. Fleet Forces personnel, requesting a Navy vessel to assist the Coast Guard in their response. The USS Ross, a 505-foot guided missile destroyer, diverted from its course to provide a refueling platform for a Coast Guard helicopter on its way to conduct the rescue mission.

Matthew Brooks, a Coast Guard 5th District Command Center command duty officer, said in a prepared statement that officials spoke with the crew aboard the boat Monday and agreed that they would depart the vessel Monday night. However, that proved challenging, according to Brooks.

"We did not want to conduct a transfer at night due to the risk of the mission and the fact that the crew was not in immediate distress," he said.
On Tuesday, Coast Guard officials dispatched crews aboard a Jayhawk helicopter and an HC-130 Hercules aircraft from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C., at approximately 6:20 a.m. to assist.

The Jayhawk crew landed on the USS Ross to refuel at approximately 7:30 a.m. and then proceeded to the location of the "Be Good Too."

The Jayhawk crew reportedly rescued Doane and the three others aboard the vessel by hoisting them into the helicopter.

Doane said he was lifted into the helicopter first, followed by the rest of the crew.
"The Coast Guard guys were great," he said.

Looking back at the ordeal Wednesday, Doane said he was never really in fear for his life.
"We never felt in imminent danger," he said.

Despite never having needed to be rescued before, Doane said the situation was much less harrowing than it would appear.

Sadly, Doane said the abandoned boat was left to drift unmanned at sea. The vessel reportedly cost in the range of $500,000, he said.

"They had a lot invested in that boat," Doane said of the owners. "It will probably end up sinking."

Coast Guard rescues Portsmouth man (with video) | SeacoastOnline.com
Great, so these sailors cost taxpayers countless dollars because they may have been uncomfortable? Also who picks up the cost of the lost boat? All boat owners with a rise in insurance costs. I hope they enjoyed their bottle of good wine before making this decision.
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Old 16-01-2014, 17:18   #173
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re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

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Originally Posted by Southern Star View Post
Yeloya, -------------------

Please understand, I too am not a fan of 'wave-piercing bows' on a cruising cat. My point was simply that we cannot say that this contributed to the boat being driven back and the rudders damaged. While I am a fan of Ted Cllements and the Antares 44, we must also understand that he has a motive to support his own design, just as he does when he writes on the benefits of a galley-down arrangement and his preferece for keels over boards. What is obvious is that his comments are not ultimate truths and that other naval architects and sailors disagree with him on all of these points.


Regardless, as I read his article, he suggests that fine entries (such as on a battleship) actually allow the bows to penetrate waves with less resistance. The risk in using them on a cruising cat is of pitchpoling, which is not what happened here. Put in simple terms, if one takes a very blunt bow (think of a barge), is it not more likely to be stopped and driven back by a wave than a comparable vessel with a finer entry?
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Brad
Agreed, one needs to take Ted Clements views in the context as after all he is promoting the Antares 44 as the Worlds Best cruising Cat.

Whilst he makes some good points throughout the many articles on the site one doesn't necessarily agree with them all and neither do all other cat designing naval architects.
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Old 16-01-2014, 17:30   #174
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re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

Is the Coast Guard/Navy over there a "free" read tax payer funded service or do you pay some sort of premium?No hidden angle or agenda simply curious.
Chris
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Old 16-01-2014, 17:33   #175
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re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

Aeroyacht website now has more details under the heading "Rogue Wave"
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Old 16-01-2014, 17:34   #176
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re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

Going to weather , wrong!!
NY to BVI in January!! wrong!
Let the seas play with a slow or in a standby situation catamaran. double wrong!!
And 2 diesels out!!! ??? dont understand, or the rudders post are cracked allowing to sea water flood the engine rooms or is just a matter of bad luck or bad design!
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Old 16-01-2014, 17:43   #177
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re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

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Originally Posted by VanIsle View Post
Aeroyacht website now has more details under the heading "Rogue Wave"
Good account , certainly the vessel is not sinking.

Rogue Wave - Aeroyacht
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Old 16-01-2014, 17:46   #178
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re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

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Originally Posted by neilpride View Post
Going to weather , wrong!!
NY to BVI in January!! wrong!
Let the seas play with a slow or in a standby situation catamaran. double wrong!!
And 2 diesels out!!! ??? dont understand, or the rudders post are cracked allowing to sea water flood the engine rooms or is just a matter of bad luck or bad design!
Have to agree that it a bad time to be sailing there but I certainly would not like to be there in any vessel in those conditions. Not sure a CSY would have fared any better. Seems they are planning for a salvage as soon as conditions improve.

Would be handy to have a transmitter of some sort on board.
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Old 16-01-2014, 17:52   #179
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Re: Alpha 42 abandoned 300 miles offshore

Some information from Captain Hank Schmitt Rogue Wave - Aeroyacht
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Old 16-01-2014, 17:55   #180
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re: Alpha 42 "Be Good Too" rescue 300 miles off Cape Henry Merged

Good to hear some details starting to come out. VanIsle had a good find.

Rogue Wave - Aeroyacht

Schmitt’s account :”….We had just passed the Gulfstream in rough waters sailing on a close reach under a double reefed mainsail at 8 knots with the autopilot engaged. All was well when suddenly we got hit by a big rogue wave that not only stopped the boat but violently pushed us backwards onto our rudders.

At that point we realized that both rudders were severely damaged. One rudder spun around the stock, the other rudder reversed against the hull and was jammed forcing the boat to port. Even with the stbd motor at full throttle the boat would only go to stbd. After spending 2 days sailing in a circle our options dwindled as the weather was deteriorating even more. Since we were 300 miles offshore we decided to make the call to be taken off the boat.

It should be noted that the rudders of the boat were built of massive 1.5 inch solid stainless round tube welded to a closed framework of 2″ wide by 1/4″ thick stainless bars with (2) vertical and (3) horizontal members. Unfortunately no rudder is designed to suddenly lurch into reverse and have 10 Tons of torque applied to them.

A salvage company will try to retrieve the boat as soon as conditions permit.
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